prenuptial agreement

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prenuptial agreement (antenuptial agreement)

n. a written contract between two people who are about to marry, setting out the terms of possession of assets, treatment of future earnings, control of the property of each, and potential division if the marriage is later dissolved. These agreements are fairly common if either or both parties have substantial assets, children from a prior marriage, potential inheritances, high incomes, or have been "taken" by a prior spouse. (See: antenuptial agreement)

prenuptial agreement

see ANTENUPTIAL AGREEMENT.
References in periodicals archive ?
A postnuptial agreement is similar to a prenup, but created after a couple marries.
In related news, as Prince Harry and Markle's royal wedding nears, many believe that the couple won't sign a prenup agreement.
Even if children from a prior marriage are not an issue, prenups can be helpful.
As long as these prenups include the factors required by their state, such as full financial disclosure, adequate legal counsel, and recitations of any legal rights to be waived, these agreements are generally legally enforceable in any future divorce action.
I've always felt a prenup for a marrying couple is a plan to fail, an exit strategy before they have even entered the marriage.
Prenups have increased in popularity in recent years and, if the Commission's proposals become law, it will provide greater certainty for family businesses and entrepreneurs.
Romantics will claim that the overwhelming argument against prenups lies in the wedding vows themselves.
Sophie Williams, of South Wales law firm Watkins and Gunn said that prenup agreements were becoming more common, particularly among people with existing assets who are marrying for a second time.
Given the current economic climate, we can only assume this awareness is fuelled by the growing popularity of celebrity prenups, and media speculation surrounding these contracts.
It must be said, however, that the courts in the UAE give little weight to a prenup, and have viewed the enforcement of prenups as appearing to be against public policy, Shari'ah law aside.
Court president Lord Phillips said judges could still waive prenups, especially when they were unfair to youngsters.
Andrejev now fully understands why prenups are necessary.