prepositional


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Related to prepositional: participial
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StP--'Itl-) or through the pattern with the initial prepositional phrase (as in (1): 1--'itl- [sup.
The legacy of the Scottish Enlightenment can be seen in more recent prohibitions against prepositional phrases.
The constructions we compare are: 1) prepositional, 2) postpositional, and 3) quasi-adpositional (see below).
In English, nouns can have pre-modifiers such as articles (determiners) and can also have post-modifiers such as prepositional phrases, relative (finite and non-finite) clauses, and adjective phrases.
Humpty sat on a wall Dumpty Participant Process Circumstance Noun group Verb group Prepositional group CLAUSE Who/what is What's What effect?
The loose, running syntax of the opening stanza lets the prepositional qualifiers accumulate without producing an effect of incompletion, and we can stop at any point after a prepositional phrase and the stanza will comprise a fully grammatical unit.
In the third chapter the author presents a detailed account of occurrences and percentage rates of each type of prepositional phrase.
It helps me to remember by thinking of prepositional phrases like 'on the moon,' 'in the school,' or 'of the world.
A number of items on the list aren't verbs at all but prepositional phrases designating states that, in this context, also implicate irreducible material concerns: "of tension," "of gravity," "of entropy," "of time.
Of course German grammar generally requires it in constructions with the genitive, and imposes at least considerable pressure for the same in most prepositional constructions).
have an argument slot for a specific location, which can be filled explicitly with a prepositional phrase like 'in Paris' or the indefinite 'somewhere', or implicitly from context.
These processes are often accompanied by participants, typically realised in noun groups, and circumstances, typically realised in adverbial groups or prepositional phrases.