prestidigitation


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Related to prestidigitation: legerdemain

prestidigitation

noun conjuring, deluding, illusion, juggling, legerdemain, magic, palming, sleight of hand, sorcery, trickery
References in periodicals archive ?
Trousdale devotes two full chapters to Nabokov, meticulously considering his prestidigitation with place and imagination.
Somehow, these people, many of whom are all about letting the invisible hand do its prestidigitation, lose sight of the fact that if BP or some other company put a well in their backyard they wouldn't suddenly have the price at the nearby gas station go down as the oil flows up.
She learned that a news show should be a show, with humor, shifting rhythms of monologue and dialogue, catchily labeled segments, and a deployment of old clips that aspires to prestidigitation.
OWWW The techniques used by magicians to manipulate cards or coins secretly are known as prestidigitation, which means "quick fingers"
The art of prestidigitation is alive and well and being exercised in the ether somewhere between ROA head office and the Horsemen's Group's tariff bunker.
We are then lead, by prestidigitation, to suppose that it is the subject (of the law, of language) who suffers this violence, when, in fact, the subject is the result, the product, of it.
His exploits spawned numerous books, movies and plays and inspired countless youngsters to take up the engaging hobby of prestidigitation.
His verbal prestidigitation leads us to expect more.
On Page 22 of this issue, Science News staff writer Laura Sanders explores the new partnership between the practitioners of prestidigitation and the investigators of cognitive neuroscience.
Blatant riffs on the historical record aside, Olson excels at incorporating a lively and compelling set of props and backdrops for his character's interactions, which he's quick to explicate in exuberant detail; thus, one learns the rules of Mexican "Monte" thoroughly, as well as the dangers of the hydraulic elevator, the secrets of prestidigitation, and a veritable cornucopia of the nuanced particulars of life in the late nineteenth century.
Although this pragmatist prestidigitation has clear appeal, it elides what Connolly at least begins to grapple with: the iron grip of ideology.
As Campbell records, Scott's maneuvering was seen in the 20th edition of The Rolliad as a kind of prestidigitation that placed his act of legal interpretation on par with MacBeth's witches'spell: