References in classic literature ?
Because he believes many people pretend to more admiration of the beauties of nature than they really feel, and is disgusted with such pretensions, he affects greater indifference and less discrimination in viewing them himself than he possesses.
price of admission one drachma at the most); and they might pay their money, and laugh at Socrates if he pretends to father these extraordinary views.
This fanciful writer pretends that its name was given to it after the passage of the Israelites, when Pharaoh perished in the waves which closed at the voice of Moses.
not the first prince of the blood, not the king's uncle, but the base conspirator, the soul of every cabal, who pretends to lead the brave people who are weak enough to believe in the honor of a prince of the blood -- not the prince nearest to the throne, not the king's uncle, I repeat, but the murderer of Chalais, of Montmorency and of Cinq-Mars, who is playing now the same game he played long ago and who thinks that he will win the game because he has a new adversary -- instead of a man who threatened, a man who smiles.
She pretends to consider herself quite beyond the age to be interested by such idle stories as these; but, for all that, whenever a story is to be told, Primrose never fails to be one of the listeners, and to make fun of it when finished.
Having had little time, and scarcely any opportunity, to become acquainted with the customs he pretends to describe, he writes them down one after another in an off-hand, haphazard style; and were the book thus produced to be translated into the tongue of the people of whom it purports to give the history, it would appear quite as wonderful to them as it does to the American public, and much more improbable.
now, pretends to call it by every abusive name he can invent; but though ‘Duke is a tolerable judge, he is a very poor carpenter, let me tell him.
Arnaud pretends that I have no logic; I have more than M.
He travels fifty miles a week to see the brute, and he pretends not to notice me when he sees me on the road; and I'm as unhappy as he is.
He is a professional beggar, though in order to avoid the police regulations he pretends to a small trade in wax vestas.
And the third, simulation, in the affirmative; when a man industriously and expressly feigns and pretends to be, that he is not.
Freddy doesn't even know the name of the people he pretends have taken it instead.