privateness


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Those activities and practices destabilize seemingly pre-determined understandings of the publicness or privateness of particular sites.
Independent wealth, that is, enables independence of thought and of expression; a private income, an income not dependent on the whims of others, buys privateness for the intellectual operations of those who possess such an income.
The first set of independent variables used to predict missionary success included conscientiousness, neuroticism, privateness, self-reliance, independence, self-control, extroversion, and the ability to bind anxiety as measured by the 16PF.
I wouldn't call it a trend away from privacy so much as away from privateness.
The results indicate that the degree of privateness, [alpha], is in fact not significantly different than 1 and therefore implies that K-12 education is almost entirely a private good with little or no spillover benefits.
In this case, he tries to manipulate exposure against its own threat; he preemptively publicizes his secret to extract it from the shame of its necessary privateness.
Weiying Zhang and Shuhe Su (1998), "The Competition Between Regions and the Privateness of China's SOEs," Economic Research, No.
Without further exploring the limits of privateness, as Casanova does in employing Goffman (17), it is more relevant to look at what extent this form of social organization can help a given society to emerge from an authoritarian system.
In this way, the privacy of the Lady and the privateness associated with her are erased, as is her relation to Gawain as the source of his dishonor.
17) The privateness of music and its autonomy as an art seems to be furthered, as observed by Said, by the notion that music does not share a common discursivity with language (Musical Elaborations 40).
It was so unlike her, such a breach of her privateness, that I was ashamed, as if I had come upon her naked.