profane

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profane

adjective bad, blasphemous, coarse, common, damnatory, dirty, disrespectful, evil, execrative, foul-spoken, foulmouthed, godless, impious, impius, imprecatory, improper, impure, indelicate, irreligious, irreverant, laic, laical, lay, maledictive, miscreant, mundane, peccable, peccant, polluted, profanus, sacrilegious, secular, shameless, sinful, smutty, temporal, transient, transitory, unblest, unconsecrated, ungodly, unhallowed, unholy, unprintable, unsaintly, unsanctified, unspeakable, vice-ridden, virtueless, vulgar, wicked, worldly
See also: abuse, contaminate, debase, diabolic, mundane, obscene, pollute, violate

PROFANE. That which has not been consecrated. By a profane place is understood one which is neither sacred, nor sanctified, nor religious. Dig. 11, 7, 2, 4. Vide Things.

References in periodicals archive ?
Virginia parents demanded that local militia officers oversee their sons' "moral conduct" by keeping them away from "gaming, profaneness, and debauchery.
Isaac Barrow, Opuscula, Clarendon, History of the Rebellion, White Kennet, Collectanea Curiosa, John Walker, Sufferings of the Clergy, Jeremy Collier, Immorality and Profaneness of the English Stage (1698).
Punishing of Vice, Profaneness, and Immorality," British Journal of
11) Unlike Collier's Short View of the Immorality and Profaneness of the English Stage (1698), these treatises do not analyze particular plays, but tend instead to elide libertinism onstage and off, characterizing scandalous plays as expressions of libertine lives.
While the congregation left the door open to dance as a legitimate form of liturgical expression in non-Western cultures, it found that dancing in the West "is tied with love, with diversion, with profaneness, with unbridling of the senses.
His "Funebria Florae, or the Downfall of May-Games" put the local maypole in the same category as all the other "rudeness, profaneness, stealing, drinking, fighting, dancing, whoring and misrule" operating in the parish of this day.
13) More recent exhortations to piety existed, for example, the 'Act for the more effective suppressing profaneness, immorality and debauchery' (26 February 1698).