profane

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profane

adjective bad, blasphemous, coarse, common, damnatory, dirty, disrespectful, evil, execrative, foul-spoken, foulmouthed, godless, impious, impius, imprecatory, improper, impure, indelicate, irreligious, irreverant, laic, laical, lay, maledictive, miscreant, mundane, peccable, peccant, polluted, profanus, sacrilegious, secular, shameless, sinful, smutty, temporal, transient, transitory, unblest, unconsecrated, ungodly, unhallowed, unholy, unprintable, unsaintly, unsanctified, unspeakable, vice-ridden, virtueless, vulgar, wicked, worldly
See also: abuse, contaminate, debase, diabolic, mundane, obscene, pollute, violate

PROFANE. That which has not been consecrated. By a profane place is understood one which is neither sacred, nor sanctified, nor religious. Dig. 11, 7, 2, 4. Vide Things.

References in classic literature ?
Captain Hall was a dreadfully profane man and used to swear blood-curdling oaths.
No rumour or echo of rumour had reached the profane in the West-End--let alone in the guileless marine suburb of Hove.
Her unconsciousness of the evil which lives in the secret thoughts and therefore in the open acts of mankind, whenever it happens that evil thought meets evil courage; her unconsciousness was to be broken into with profane violence with desecrating circumstances, like a temple violated by a mad, vengeful impiety.
You are so very irreligious, so exceedingly undutiful, so horribly profane,' rejoined his father, turning his face lazily towards him, and cracking another nut, 'that I positively must interrupt you here.
Temporary construction to hidden obligations, a sort of Twenty Four Hours with added Mickey Mouse ears, muddies and profanes this history while acknowledging its significance.
Although specialized studies in the past twenty years have added much to our understanding of early Parisian humanism, the first part of Christianisme et lettres profanes remains a valuable introduction to philological humanism and its conflicts with religious orthodoxy.
The offense that some have registered in relation to the realism of Jones' installation is that he not only profanes and exploits the victims and their families, whose stories he includes in Monster, but that he tampers with the "truth" of history in what amounts to an estheticized "docudrama" that toys, pointlessly, with real life.