profuseness


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References in classic literature ?
However, what she withheld from the infant, she bestowed with the utmost profuseness on the poor unknown mother, whom she called an impudent slut, a wanton hussy, an audacious harlot, a wicked jade, a vile strumpet, with every other appellation with which the tongue of virtue never fails to lash those who bring a disgrace on the sex.
Glegg," said the lady, pouring out the milk with unusual profuseness, as much as to say, if he wanted milk he should have it with a vengeance.
The profuseness of the sciences, far from strengthening our faith, has upset our unity and obscured our sense of values.
Elton takes Jane under her wing to call attention to the scarcity of resources in the Bates household, and highlight her own privileged status: in detailing her favors to Jane, she loudly advertises the profuseness of her dinners ("'which could not make the addition of Jane Fairfax, at any time, the least inconvenient'" [306]), and the idleness of her many male servants in comparison with the Bates's single maid ("'it is a kindness to employ our men"" [320]).