proper


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Proper

Fit; correct; reasonably sufficient. That which is well adapted or appropriate.

Proper care is the degree of care a reasonable, prudent person would use under similar circumstances.

A proper party is an individual who has an interest in the litigation. He or she can be joined—that is, brought into the action—but his or her nonjoinder will not result in a dismissal. A substantial judicial decree can still be rendered in the absence of a proper party. A proper party is distinguishable from a necessary party in that the latter must be joined in order to give complete relief to the litigants.

Cross-references

Joinder.

proper

adjective acceptable, accurate, adapted, apposite, appropriate, apt, aptus, becoming, befitting, condign, conventional, correct, decorous, ethical, fitting, formal, free of error, honest, idoneus, legitimate, moral, opportune, orthodox, particular, precise, rectus, relevant, right, righteous, seasonable, seemly, suitable, suited, tasteful, true, unmistaken, virtuous, well-bred
Associated concepts: proper party
Foreign phrases: Non solum quid licet, sed quid est conneniens, est considerandum; quia nihil quod est inconneniens est licitum.Not only that which is lawful, but that which is convenient is to be considered, because nothing which is inconvenient is lawful.
See also: accurate, admissible, allowable, applicable, appropriate, due, eligible, equitable, evenhanded, fair, fit, fitting, formal, honest, juridical, just, justifiable, lawful, legal, licit, meritorious, moral, official, orthodox, permissible, precise, rational, reasonable, regular, relevant, right, rightful, seasonable, separate, several, suitable, tenable, unprejudiced

PROPER. That which is essential, suitable, adapted, and correct.
     2. Congress is authorized by art, 1, s. 8, of the constitution of the United States, "to make all laws which shall be necessary and proper, for carrying into execution the foregoing powers, and all other powers vested by this constitution of the United States, in any department. or officer thereof." See Necessary and Proper.

References in classic literature ?
Perhaps, however, he is kept silent by his fear of offending, and I shall, therefore, give him a hint, by a line to Oxford, that his sister and I both think a letter of proper submission from him, addressed perhaps to Fanny, and by her shewn to her mother, might not be taken amiss; for we all know the tenderness of Mrs.
He had nothing to urge against it, but still resisted the idea of a letter of proper submission; and therefore, to make it easier to him, as he declared a much greater willingness to make mean concessions by word of mouth than on paper, it was resolved that, instead of writing to Fanny, he should go to London, and personally intreat her good offices in his favour.
Who is likely to make suitable provisions for the public defense, as that body to which the guardianship of the public safety is confided; which, as the centre of information, will best understand the extent and urgency of the dangers that threaten; as the representative of the WHOLE, will feel itself most deeply interested in the preservation of every part; which, from the responsibility implied in the duty assigned to it, will be most sensibly impressed with the necessity of proper exertions; and which, by the extension of its authority throughout the States, can alone establish uniformity and concert in the plans and measures by which the common safety is to be secured?
For the absurdity must continually stare us in the face of confiding to a government the direction of the most essential national interests, without daring to trust it to the authorities which are indispensible to their proper and efficient management.
The national government, in such cases, will not be affected by this pride, but will proceed with moderation and candor to consider and decide on the means most proper to extricate them from the difficulties which threaten them.
If they should derive less benefit, therefore, from the Union in some respects than the less distant States, they will derive greater benefit from it in other respects, and thus the proper equilibrium will be maintained throughout.
The proper season is when the weather is very dry; the special days are those when the moon is in the constellations of the Sieve, the Wall, the Wing or the Cross-bar; for these four are all days of rising wind.
In every army, the five developments connected with fire must be known, the movements of the stars calculated, and a watch kept for the proper days.
The people will imitate the nobles, and the result is a thorough diffusion of the proper feeling.
There was the proper and awful pause while the bridegroom was kept waiting at the church.
Considering how flexible thin wax is, I do not see that there is any difficulty in the bees, whilst at work on the two sides of a strip of wax, perceiving when they have gnawed the wax away to the proper thinness, and then stopping their work.
Simonides, then, after the manner of poets, would seem to have spoken darkly of the nature of justice; for he really meant to say that justice is the giving to each man what is proper to him, and this he termed a debt.