proposition

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Related to propositions: prepositions

proposition

noun approach, arrangement, assertion, assumption, bid, condicio, conjecture, course of action, declared intention, design, formulated intention, hypothesis, idea, offer, overture, plan, position, postulate, premise, presentation, program of action, project, proposal, propositio, prospectus, provisional hypothesis, resolution, rogatio, scheme, strategy, submission, suggestion, supposition, tender, tentative approach, tentaaive statement, terms proposed, theory, thesis
See also: advice, affair, affirmance, agenda, application, argument, assertion, basis, bid, business, campaign, claim, clause, contention, invitation, issue, matter, matter in dispute, measure, motion, overture, plan, platform, policy, principle, project, proposal, question, rationale, recommendation, resolution, strategy, subject, suggestion, theory, thesis, ultimatum

PROPOSITION. An offer to do something. Until it has been accepted, a proposition may be withdrawn by the party who makes it; and to be binding, the acceptance must be in the same terms, without any variation. Vide Acceptance; Offer; To retract; and 1 L. R. 190; 4 L. R. 80.

References in classic literature ?
It may be said that the tactile images are merely present, without any accompanying belief; but I think this view, though sometimes correct, derives its plausibility as a general proposition from our thinking of explicit conscious belief only.
It is suggested, by the theory we are considering, that this difference of effects constitutes what is meant by saying that in the second case I believe the proposition suggested, while in the first case I do not.
It is clear that a proposition can be either believed or merely considered, and that the content is the same in both cases.
Such a man, though not moving, is in a very different condition from that of a man quietly at rest And so the man who is considering a proposition without believing it will be in a state of tension, restraining the natural tendency to act upon the proposition which he would display if nothing interfered.
If the mere co-existence of the content and the belief-feeling sufficed, whenever we were having (say) a memory-feeling we should be remembering any proposition which came into our minds at the same time.
We may sum up our analysis, in the case of bare assent to a proposition not expressed in words, as follows: (a) We have a proposition, consisting of interrelated images, and possibly partly of sensations; (b) we have the feeling of assent, which is presumably a complex sensation demanding analysis; (c) we have a relation, actually subsisting, between the assent and the proposition, such as is expressed by saying that the proposition in question is what is assented to.
There is no way of distinguishing, in words, between a memory and an assent to a proposition about the past: "I ate my breakfast" and "Caesar conquered Gaul" have the same verbal form, though (assuming that I remember my breakfast) they express occurrences which are psychologically very different.
Thus James says: "Everyone knows the difference between imagining a thing and believing in its existence, between supposing a proposition and acquiescing in its truth.
The proposition alluded to was the one, already mentioned, for the establishment of an American Fur Company in the Atlantic States.
A dam fool proposition," was Liverpool's judgment, when Charles had concluded.
This simple proposition will teach us how little reason there is to expect, that the persons intrusted with the administration of the affairs of the particular members of a confederacy will at all times be ready, with perfect good-humor, and an unbiased regard to the public weal, to execute the resolutions or decrees of the general authority.