References in periodicals archive ?
When his Tory successor Lord Bates lifted the ban on the group this year, he said it was clear it was "concerned in terrorism" at the time of proscription.
It also operates under other names, which all fall under the same proscription order: Al Muhajiroun, Islam4UK, Call to Submission, Islamic Path, London School of Sharia, Muslims Against Crusades, Need4Khilafah, the Shariah Project and the Islamic Dawah Association.
The biggest proof for that is the continuation of the proscription affecting the minds in the Islamic world, in the hope that their concomitant absence will not stand as proof for the difficulty of getting rid of that proscription.
Mr Johnson said the ban was needed to tackle terrorism and warned the group had tried to escape proscription simply by changing its name.
Johnson said the organization was already banned under two other names -- Al Ghurabaa and The Saved Sect -- and militant groups should not be able to circumvent proscription simply by changing their names.
We are clear that an organisation should not be able to circumvent proscription by simply changing its name.
He added: "We are clear that an organisation should not be able to circumvent proscription by simply changing its name.
We are clear that an organization should not be able to circumvent proscription by simply changing its name," he added.
4) The crucial distinction between the Illinois proscription against eavesdropping and its federal counterpart is that under the Illinois statute, both parties to the conversation must agree to have their conversation recorded, while under the federal statute only one party need consent.
539c (proscription regarding eavesdropping on oral conversation: all party consent, except that the proscription does not apply to otherwise lawful activities of police officers);
The former is entirely open-ended, allowing us to never be able to fulfill its proscription, and the latter depends on our complete knowledge of others and the situation we are in.
He does not call for proscription, insisting that researchers and theorists have an absolute right to pursue their topic of their choice and to offer interpretations or practical application as they see fit.