ego

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Related to psychoanalysis: Humanistic psychology, behaviorism, Sigmund Freud

ego

noun character, conceit, egoism, egotism, identity, image of oneself, individuality, person, pride, pride in administration by others, pride in place in society, pride in reputation, pride in status, self, self-concept, self-esteem, self-identity, self-image
Associated concepts: alter ego

EGO. I, myself. This term is used in forming genealogical tables, to represent the person who is the object of inquiry.

References in periodicals archive ?
Psychoanalysis thus provides an opportunity to be deeply involved with other people in a way that is careful yet also spontaneous, caring, and respectful, even as it is asymmetrical, and certainly nonphysical.
Paul Marcus, PhD, is a supervising and training analyst at the National Psychological Association for Psychoanalysis.
THE INSTITUTE OF PSYCHOANALYSIS is the main professional organisation for psychoanalysts in the UK and a global centre of excellence in the provision of psychoanalytic training, education, publication and clinical practice.
By working out a phenomenological psychology, Husserl wished to lay the ground work for humanistic science, including psychoanalysis.
Randy's tireless pioneering efforts to provide a voice for psychoanalysis at CAPS, his command of the psychoanalytic literature and expertise in psychoanalytic research (2004), his masterful classroom presence at Rosemead, and his enjoyment of the respect of the psychoanalytic community from Los Angeles to New York and abroad are profoundly appreciated and sorely missed.
This prologue leads into the first chapter where the sequence of events in Jones' life leads circuitously into the world of psychoanalysis.
This special volume of JPT is dedicated to the memory of Randall Lehmann Sorenson, Professor of Psychology at Rosemead School of Psychology, Training and Supervising analyst at the Institute of Contemporary Psychoanalysis in Los Angeles, and private practitioner in Pasadena, California.
These psychoanalysts saw themselves as brokers of social change and viewed psychoanalysis as a challenge to conventional political and social traditions.
To suppress the ideal, heterodox clerics (and their apologists in the academy and media) engage in one, and usually several, of the following: evasion, ad hominems, pseudo-apologies, emotionalism, tendentious sloganeering, misplaced concreteness, and armchair psychoanalysis.
The age was the postwar period, filled with anxiety, shocked by the atom bomb, changed by machines, immersed in Freudian theory and psychoanalysis, swinging with improvisational jazz.
Because it predates the '60s, it really is about psychoanalysis, self- awareness, self-examination and in the same way people may disdain psychoanalysis .
There is something uncanny at the heart of psychoanalysis that