publication


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Related to publication: Publication 4681, Publication 502, Publication 946

Publication

Making something known to the community at large, exhibiting, displaying, disclosing, or revealing.

Publication is the act of offering something for the general public to inspect or scrutinize. It means to convey knowledge or give notice.

In Copyright law, publication is making a book or other written material available to anyone interested by distributing or offering it for sale. In the law of Libel and Slander, publication means communicating the statement in issue to a third person other than the plaintiff (the individual whom the alleged defamatory statement concerns).

Publication of a will refers to the testator's informing the witnesses to the document of his or her intent to have the instrument operate as a will.

In the procedural rules governing the Practice of Law, publication of a summons is the process of publishing it in a newspaper, when required by law, in order to notify a defendant of the lawsuit.

publication

n. 1) anything made public by print (as in a newspaper, magazine, pamphlet, letter, telegram, computer modem or program, poster, brochure or pamphlet), orally, or by broadcast (radio, television). 2) placing a legal notice in an approved newspaper of general publication in the county or district in which the law requires such notice to be published. 3) in the law of defamation (libel and slander) publication of an untruth about another only requires giving the information to a single person. Thus one letter can be the basis of a suit for libel, and telling one person is sufficient to show publication of slander. (See: notice, defamation, libel, slander)

publication

(Disclosure), noun advertisement, announcement, broadcast, circulation, communication, currency, dissemination, enlightenment, expositio, issuance, notice, notification, praedicatio, presentation to the public, proclamation, promulgation, pronouncement, pronuntiatio, propagation, public announcement, release, report, revelation, statement, transmission
Associated concepts: defamation, libel, slander

publication

(Printed matter), noun book, editio libri, edition, folio, issue, literary magazine, literature, magazine, organ, periodical, printing, reading matter, tome, volume, work, writing, written discourse
See also: charter, declaration, disclosure, issuance, pandect, proclamation, pronouncement, publicity

PUBLICATION. The act by which a thing is made public.
     2. It differs from promulgation, (q.v.) and see also Toullier, Dr. Civ. Fr. Titre Preliminaire, n. 59, for the difference in the meaning of these two words.
     3. Publication has different meanings. When applied to a law, it signifies the rendering public the existence of the law; when it relates to the opening the depositions taken in a case in chancery, it means that liberty is given to the officer in whose custody the depositions of witnesses in a cause are lodged, either by consent of parties, or by the rules or orders of the court, to show the depositions openly, and to give out copies of them. Pract. Reg. 297; 1 Harr. Ch. Pr. 345; Blake's Ch. Pr. 143. When it refers to a libel, it is its communication to a second or third person, or a greater number. Holt on Libels, 254, 255, 290; Stark. on Slander, 350; Holt's N. P. Rep. 299; 2 Bl. R. 1038; 1 Saund. 112, n. 3. And when spoken of a will, it signifies that the testator has done some act from which it can be concluded that he intended the instrument to operate as his will. Cruise, Dig. tit. 38, c. 5, s. 47; 3 Atk. 161; 4 Greenl. R. 220; 3 Rawle, R. 15; Com. Dig. Estates by devise, E 2. Vide Com. Dig. Chancery, Q; Id. Libel, B 1; Ibid. Action upon the case for defamation, G 4; Roscoe's Cr. Ev. 529; Bac. Ab. Libel, B; Hawk. P. C. B. 1, c. 73, s. 10; 3 Yeates' R. 128; 10 Johns. R. 442. As to the publication of an award, see 6 N. H. Rep. 36. See, generally, Bouv. Inst. Index, h.t.

References in classic literature ?
Its immediate acceptance and publication followed in 1846.
It was not his cue to appear at all conscious of the high honor he thus unexpectedly enjoyed; but, by leading his guest into the conversation, to elicit some important ethical ideas, which might, in obtaining a place in his contemplated publication, enlighten the human race, and at the same time immortalize himself - ideas which, I should have added, his visitor's great age, and well-known proficiency in the science of morals, might very well have enabled him to afford.
She would not look at such a frivolous publication.
Because,' said Annette, 'unfortunately, I had to pay the expenses of publication.
Wharton made extensive stylistic, punctuation, and spelling changes and revisions between the serial and book publication, and more than thirty subsequent changes were made after the second impression of the book edition had been run off.
THIS little work was finished in the year 1803, and intended for immediate publication.
In a word, without going over all the journals in the world, there was not a scientific publication, from the Journal of Evangelical Missions to the Revue Algerienne et Coloniale, from the Annales de la Propagation de la Foi to the Church Missionary Intelligencer, that had not something to say about the affair in all its phases.
4] was sold at Christie's shortly after the discussion which followed the publication of Mr.
I knew it had been written, but I would not have advised its publication," said Lebedeff's nephew, "because it is premature.
Holmes has shown to the continued publication of his experiences.
I think that for a year after the publication of this article every association and every conference or religious body of any kind, of my race, that met, did not fail before adjourning to pass a resolution condemning me, or calling upon me to retract or modify what I had said.
This was the Reverend Edward Casaubon, noted in the county as a man of profound learning, understood for many years to be engaged on a great work concerning religious history; also as a man of wealth enough to give lustre to his piety, and having views of his own which were to be more clearly ascertained on the publication of his book.