fever

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fever

(Excitement), noun agitation, ardor, arousing, delirium, desire, disquiet, eagerness, enthusiasm, exhilaration, fervency, fever pitch, feverish excitement, feverishness, fire, fomentation, frenzy, galvanization, heat, intensity, panic, passion, provocation, stimulation, stirring up, tizzy, turmoil, upset, working up, zeal, zealousness, zest
Associated concepts: proceedings reaching a fever pitch

fever

(Illness), noun affliction, ailment, eleeated temperature, feverishness, has a disorder, has a malady, has an affliction, has an ailment, ill health, illness, in poor health, infirmity, not healthy, sickness, temperature
Associated concepts: fee services, health care
See also: furor
References in periodicals archive ?
He was eventually committed to an asylum, where he was beaten by guards and, in a tragic dose of irony, died of septicemia, the same bacterial spread that led women with puerperal fever to die of their disease.
Similarly, supported by doctors' telephonic advice, most women with puerperal fever and about half of those with abortion complications could be managed locally.
Semmelweis instructed his interns to wash their hands with chlorinated lime solutions and documented an immediate reduction in puerperal fever incidence.
Loudon's other main emphasis--the epidemiological--is given voice in chapters on "Epidemic Puerperal Fever in Towns" (chapter four), "Puerperal Fever and the Lying-in Hospitals" (chapter five), "Puerperal Fever in the Early Twentieth Century" (chapter ten), and, perhaps most importantly, in the closing chapter, "The Epidemiology of Puerperal Fever" (chapter twelve).
Semmelweis hypothesized that puerperal fever was spread by the hands of physicians and midwives.
The whole plant of Cyperus rotundus was mixed with leaves of Psidium guajava and Punica granatum for treatment of girani disease (see below) in men and puerperal fever in women; the whole plant of Cyperus rotundus was mixed with leaves of Lawsonia inermis and Azadirachta indica for treatment of skin diseases, including eczema.
99) is inspired by Alexander Gordon, an 18th century doctor in Aberdeen, when the city was in the grip of puerperal fever, or childbed fever.