puritanical

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They were also not fond of other aspects of the puritanic restrictiveness of the Soviet culture.
Joe's father is quite different from Sam's -- puritanic, not dissolute; repressive rather than self-absorbed, and consequently hated rather than despised by his adopted son.
11) As the refuge of the Roman Catholic priest, Eustace Lyle, and as the provider of rituals and festivals for "the People," Beaumanoir embodies architecturally the revisionist Tory project of rescuing "our Roman Catholic subjects from the Puritanic yoke" (101).
a widening of our electoral scheme, great facilities to commerce, and the rescue of our Roman Catholic subjects from the Puritanic yoke" (101), Disraeli invents the fictional prototype of the Tory Democracy that would emerge in the Ministry of 1874-1880.
Puritanic seventeenth-century New England, Hester Prynne's repentant, selfless, good citizenship is required for the emerging civil order.
In Hawthorne's mid-nineteenth century construction of Puritanic seventeenth-century New England, Hester Prynne's repentant, selfless, good citizenship is required for the emerging civil order.
When he receives a letter from his old guardian, the young storyteller cringes: "I seemed to see the puritanic figure of my guardian, standing among the fripperies of the theatre, and pointing to the players,--the fantastic and effeminate men, the painted women, the giddy girl in boy's clothes, merrier than modest,--pointing to these with solemn ridicule, and eyeing me with stern rebuke.
The critic and reformer George Ripley, in his 1850 New York Tribune essay ("The Gothic, the Supernatural, the Imagination"), commented that "the weird and ghostly legends of the Puritanic history present a singularly congenial field for the exercise of Mr.
Where an older analysis found in the post-coital romance of The Scarlet Letter the puritanic theme of "guilt," a newer, more archeological critique uncovers an important site of enduring sexual metaphor.
The May-Pole of Merry Mount" is at once a meditation on the danger of "merriment" out of control, a lament for the loss of Merry Old England, and a prophecy of the triumph of Puritanic gloom.
Although he was German born and largely educated in Berlin, Walter Kaufmann kept a safe distance from Wagnerian opera, wishing, in his focus on the heroic struggle of Hester to remain strong and resilent in a doomed relationship, to create an opera responsive to Puritanic mores and values and to Chillingworth's obsession with gaining revenge.