purport

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Related to purports: reconfirm, prospectively, interrelationship

Purport

To convey, imply, or profess; to have an appearance or effect.

The purport of an instrument generally refers to its facial appearance or import, as distinguished from the tenor of an instrument, which means an exact copy or duplicate.

purport

verb allege, allude, claim, connote, convey, declare, declare with positiveness, denote, express, imply, indicare, indicate, infer, insinuate, intend, intimate, mean, pose as, pretend, profess, represent, say, show, significare, signify, state, suggest
See also: amount, bespeak, connotation, consequence, content, context, cornerstone, denote, design, gist, import, intent, main point, materiality, meaning, point, pretend, purpose, result, significance, signification, signify, spirit, substance, tenor, value

PURPORT, pleading. This word means the substance of a writing, as it appears on the face of it, to the eye that reads it; it differs from tenor. (q.v.), 2 Russ. on Cr. 365; 1 Chit. Cr. Law, 235; 1 East, R. 179, and the cases in the notes.

References in classic literature ?
Phoebe went accordingly, but perplexed herself, meanwhile, with queries as to the purport of the scene which she had just witnessed, and also whether judges, clergymen, and other characters of that eminent stamp and respectability, could really, in any single instance, be otherwise than just and upright men.
I have here four letters which purport to come from the missing man.
I dare say my priest had his notion of the general shape and purport, the gross material body of the thing, but he did not trouble me with it, while we sat tranced together in the presence of its soul.
Slowly the men standing there at the board of Sir Roger de Leybourn grasped the full purport of that awful name.
Whereupon he presently began to sing verses to the praise of God, which he had never heard, the purport whereof was thus:--
Fyne had to explain the full purport of the intelligence to Mrs.
The letter then which arrived at the end of the preceding chapter was from Mr Allworthy, and the purport of it was, his intention to come immediately to town, with his nephew Blifil, and a desire to be accommodated with his usual lodgings, which were the first floor for himself, and the second for his nephew.
Pravdin was a well-known Panslavist abroad, and Countess Lidia Ivanovna described the purport of his letter.
As Durdles and Jasper come near, they are addressed by an inscribed paper lantern over the door, setting forth the purport of the house.
I should not have understood the purport of this book had not Felix, in reading it, given very minute explanations.
Hugh shrugged his shoulders, and with a disdainful look, which showed, either that he had overheard, or that he guessed the purport of their whispering, did as he was told.
The purport of the muttering was: 'that Rogue Riderhood, by George