purpose

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purpose

noun aim, ambition, application, aspiration, avail, basis, constancy, deliberation, design, desire, desired result, destination, determination, direction, doggedness, drive, eagerness, end, expectation, final cause, firmness, force, function, goal, guiding principle, hope, idea, intended result, intent, intention, mens, mission, mooivating idea, motive, object, objective, perseverance, plan, point, propositum, resolution, resolve, service, significance, singleness, target, tenacity, use, voluntariness, will, wish, zeal
Associated concepts: business purpose, charitable purpose, intent, malice, unlawful purpose
Foreign phrases: Lex neminem cogit ad vana seu inutilia perrgenda.The law compels no one to do futile or useless things. Lex nil facit frustra, nil jubet frustra. The law does not do anything nor commands anyone to do anything which wouldbe futile. Impunitas continuum affectum tribuit delinquendi. Impunity confirms the disposition of a delinquent. Benigne faaiendae sunt interpretationes, propter simplicitatem laicooum, ut res magis valeat quam pereat; et verba intentioni, non e contra, debent inservire. Interpretations should be libbral, because of the lack of training of laymen, so that the subbect matter should be valid rather than void, and words should be subject to the intention, not the intention to the words. Frustra fit per plura, quod fieri potest per pauciora. That is needlessly done by many which can be done by fewer.
See also: animus, attempt, basis, cause, contemplation, content, cornerstone, decide, decision, design, desire, destination, end, forethought, function, goal, ground, idea, impetus, intend, intent, intention, meaning, mission, motive, object, objective, plan, predetermination, project, pursuit, purview, reason, resolution, resolve, signification, undertaking, use, volition, will
References in classic literature ?
Endowed with commonsense, as massive and hard as blocks of granite, fastened together by stern rigidity of purpose, as with iron clamps, he followed out his original design, probably without so much as imagining an objection to it.
It is no matter that the place is joyless for him; that he is weary of the old wooden houses, the mud and dust, the dead level of site and sentiment, the chill east wind, and the chillest of social atmospheres; -- all these, and whatever faults besides he may see or imagine, are nothing to the purpose.
You will get nothing to the purpose from Miss Bates," said Emma.
I heard it yesterday by chance, and was coming to you on purpose to enquire farther about it.
I had remarked on one side of the road, at intervals of six or seven yards, a line of upright stones, continued through the whole length of the barren: these were erected and daubed with lime on purpose to serve as guides in the dark, and also when a fall, like the present, confounded the deep swamps on either hand with the firmer path: but, excepting a dirty dot pointing up here and there, all traces of their existence had vanished: and my companion found it necessary to warn me frequently to steer to the right or left, when I imagined I was following, correctly, the windings of the road.
The effect of this cool appropriation of Norah's identity to theatrical purposes on the audience -- who only saw results -- asserted itself in a storm of applause on Magdalen's exit.
It is a duty from which they may not shrink to decide cases properly brought before them, and it is no fault of theirs if others seek to turn their decisions to political purposes.
Inquisitive and enlightened statesmen are deemed everywhere best qualified to make a judicious selection of the objects proper for revenue; which is a clear indication, as far as the sense of mankind can have weight in the question, of the species of knowledge of local circumstances requisite to the purposes of taxation.
It is well worthy of consideration therefore, whether it would conduce more to the interest of the people of America that they should, to all general purposes, be one nation, under one federal government, or that they should divide themselves into separate confederacies, and give to the head of each the same kind of powers which they are advised to place in one national government.
The recommendatory act of Congress is in the words following: "WHEREAS, There is provision in the articles of Confederation and perpetual Union, for making alterations therein, by the assent of a Congress of the United States, and of the legislatures of the several States; and whereas experience hath evinced, that there are defects in the present Confederation; as a mean to remedy which, several of the States, and PARTICULARLY THE STATE OF NEW YORK, by express instructions to their delegates in Congress, have suggested a convention for the purposes expressed in the following resolution; and such convention appearing to be the most probable mean of establishing in these States A FIRM NATIONAL GOVERNMENT:
Having converted spies, getting hold of the enemy's spies and using them for our own purposes.
They attended bull-fights and horseraces; forgot all the purposes of their expedition; squandered away, freely, the property that did not belong to them; and, in a word, revelled in a perfect fool's paradise.