put

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Put

An option—a right that operates as a continuing proposal—given in exchange for consideration—something of value—permitting its holder to sell a particular stock or commodity at a fixed price for a stated quantity and within a limited time period.

A put is purchased for a fee paid to the person who agrees to accept the stock or goods if they are offered. The purchaser of this right to sell expects the price of the stock or commodity to decrease so that he can deliver the stock or commodity at a profit. If the price rises, the option need not be exercised. The reverse transaction is a call.

put

(Place), verb apply, assign a place, attach, base, deposit, dispense, fix, give, imbed, implant, infuse, inject, install, instill, introduce, lodge, park, place, plant, raise, repose, seat, set, site, situate, station, submit, tender
Associated concepts: constructive bailment, involuntary bailment

put

(Phrase), verb ascribe, attribute, cast, describe, impute, pose, posit, postulate, present, propound, say, set forth, state, throw
See also: advance, deposit, dispose, give, house, impute, introduce, locate, lodge, phrase, place, plant, raise, repose, situated, submit

TO PUT, pleading. To select, to demand; as, the said C D puts himself upon the country; that is, he selects the trial by jury, as the mode of settling the matter in dispute, and does not rely upon an issue in law. Gould, Pl. c. 6. part 1, Sec. 19.

References in classic literature ?
Princess Mary shuddered; her nurse, putting down the stocking she was knitting, went to the window and leaning out tried to catch the open casement.
It's a kind of pleating," explained Dorothy, putting down the dog.
He soon spied them out, and putting down the candle, deliberately proceeded to cast them into the fire: palette, paints, bladders, pencils, brushes, varnish: I saw them all consumed: the palette-knives snapped in two, the oil and turpentine sent hissing and roaring up the chimney.
George, slowly putting down his saucer without tasting its contents, is laughingly beginning, "Why, what the deuce, Phil--" when he stops, seeing that Phil is counting on his dirty fingers.