quit


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Quit

To vacate; remove from; surrender possession.

When a tenant leaves premises that he or she has been renting, the tenant is said to quit such premises.

A notice to quit is written notification given by a landlord to a tenant that indicates that the landlord wants to repossess the premises and that the tenant must vacate them at a certain designated time.

quit

v. to leave, used in a written notice to a tenant to leave the premises (notice to quit). (See: notice to quit, unlawful detainer)

quit

(Discontinue), verb abandon, abdicate, abjure, abort, acknowledge defeat, admit defeat, apostatize, arrest, back out, become inactive, break off, bring to an end, call a halt, capitulate, cause a stoppage, cause to halt, cease, cease progress, cease to use, cease work, check, come to a standstill, cut out, desist from, drop, finish, forgo, forsake, forswear, give up, go into retirement, go out of business, halt, have done with, intermit, lay aside, leave off, leave unninished, make an end of, nol-pros, put a stop to, put an end to, relinquish, renounce, resign, retire, secede, stand aside, step down, stop, succumb, suffer defeat, surcease, suspend, tergiversate, terminate, withdraw, yield

quit

(Evacuate), verb abandon, abscond, beat a retreat, decamp, defect, depart from, desert, disappear, egress, escape, exit, flee, forsake, get out, go, go away, go forth, go out, hurry away, leave, make a departure, make an exit, move away, part, pull out, remove oneself, retire, run away, separate from, set forth, set out, take flight, take leave, take leave of, take oneself away, turn one's back on, vacate, vanish, walk away, walk out, withdraw
Associated concepts: notice to quit, quit

quit

(Free of), verb absolve, acquit, clear, deliver, disembroil, disencumber, disengage, disentangle, emancipate, exonerate, extricate, grant amnesty to, lift controls, manumit, pardon, release, render free, rescue, set at liberty, set free

quit

(Repay), verb balance accounts, be even with, clear a debt, clear accounts, compensate, discharge a debt, make compensation, make payment, make reparation, make restitution, pay a debt, pay an indemnity, pay back, pay in full, pay off, pay old debts, recompense, refund, reimburse, remunerate, restore, return, settle a debt, settle an account
See also: abandon, cease, comport, defect, demean, demit, depart, discontinue, evacuate, forfeit, forgo, forswear, halt, leave, part, pay, recoup, reimburse, relinquish, remise, renege, renounce, resign, retire, retreat, secede, shirk, stop, submit, vacate, withdraw, yield

quit

1 to free, release, absolve.
2 to give up, renounce, leave.
References in classic literature ?
He was not only to quit his home, but to see it in the hands of others; a trial of fortitude, which stronger heads than Sir Walter's have found too much.
No, no," said Athos, "an aide-de-camp ought not thus to quit his general.
Get out of here and quit drinking before you begin.
Which means I'd give the whole shooting match just to be back where I was before I quit sleeping under the stars and come into the hen-coops
But to quit, - for him, Martin, to quit, - that was impossible!
Being an American boy, and a proud American boy, I did not immediately quit.
Then I quit the job of learning electricity by doing more than two men's work for a boy's wages, went home, and proceeded to sleep the clock around.
He was living in a place absolutely secluded from public observation on all sides of it--thanks to his resolution to remain at the cottage, even after his landlady had insulted him by sending him a notice to quit.
This morning I gave him notice to quit, and offered him his money back if he wanted it.
Then let me tell him once for all, through you, that I will come into and go out of this place as often as I like, so long as he keeps Nell here; and that if he wants to be quit of me, he must first be quit of her.
Frederica shall be Sir James's wife before she quits my house, and she may whimper, and the Vernons may storm, I regard them not.
Under the assumption that people typically switch jobs during an economic expansion to pursue higher paying jobs, Faberman and Justiniano assert that aggregate wages rise in concert with the quit rate.