quixotic


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Related to quixotic: Don Quixote
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Quixotic kicks off the city of Eugene's (sub)Urban Projections Digital Art & Media Festival, which continues Friday.
by Cervantes' novelistic techniques as employed in Don Quixote"), "Cervantic" ("the employment of a quixotic character obsessed with the adventures and stereotypes they have read in romances"), and "Cervantine" (seemingly of or related to Cervantes in general) (11, 13, 16).
The title of the film may be The Lone Ranger but this is Depp''s show and once again, he conjures a quixotic, comic creation out of the ether.
Operation Quixotic was launched in Mold after complaints from local residents and concerns raised at a neighbourhood police forum.
Grant Cogswell was a cab driver and sometime poet who had led, with another cabbie, a quixotic ballot campaign to expand Seattle's downtown monorail and won.
However, McGinness's manner is rather more quixotic than Durer's: He dispenses with text altogether in favor of baroque decoration, excited lines and rich colors converging in spontaneous pseudologos with a legibility all their own.
Quixotic Erotic by Tamai Kobayashi (Arsenal Pulp Press 2003)
Rarely present in BBS himself, Scott stitches together scraps of his subjects' recollections into eight topical narrative collages focusing on different aspects of BBS culture, from the quixotic struggle to make a buck off the boards to the fierce rivalries between the BBS art groups, teams of graphically gifted kids who competed to produce the most dazzling images working from a palate of clunky colored blocks.
Selecting the Bravo Business Awards candidates is a quixotic venture, even in the best of times.
However, a few quixotic charges by T-Mobile's Kazakh Alexandre Vinokourov aside, Armstrong and his Discovery team-mates exerted complete control over a timid peloton, which was won by Phonak rider Oscar Pereiro of Spain.
Whether chugging through Central Europe on the Orient Express, marching around the ruins at Machu Picchu, or witnessing the birth of baby seals on a Canadian ice floe, Hanns Ebensten--the man who virtually invented the gay travel industry when he formed his "for men only" tour company in 1972--is more than a travel reporter At 81, Ebensten is a quixotic adventurer--planning, living, then fastidiously recording each of his sublime, spirited, and often salty expeditions.
If voters could cast ballots for first- and second-choice candidates in an "instant runoff" election, there would be no downside to voting for quixotic progressive candidates.