racialism


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References in periodicals archive ?
What we've been witnessing since past few decades is that some people have been trying to promote provincialism and racialism instead of nationalism.
But racialism or discrimination of any form is to be deplored-and ways found to eliminate the practice.
The racialism and idea of competition, termed social Darwinism or neo-Darwinism in 1944, were discussed by European scientists and also in the Vienna press during the 1920s.
However, the rude attitude, race, racism and racialism are also the tools exploited by the various communities.
THE three gover ning bodies of Great Britain are equally guilty of blatant racialism and inequity.
The destruction of the morials is a sign of racialism in Germany, which many denied during the trial of Marwa's killer," said Tareq el-Sherbini, the brother of Marwa, an Egyptian pharmacist killed in a courtroom in Dresden, Germany, last year.
Nostalgia crosses the Atlantic and flows into post-Civil War American racialism and generates a new diagnostic category, cachexia Africana, a complex of symptoms including dirt-eating--yet poor whites eat dirt as well as slaves and ex-slaves, and, as a widened anthropological perspective discloses, so have people in many cultures across time and geography, with no suspicion of pathology and even a sound nutritional rationale (Fleissner).
He also received today travelers Hussein al-Mansour and Ali al-Hamzan, who had traveled the Kingdom's regions to propagate his campaign against fanaticism and racialism with all of their forms.
Doyle says that in the political rhetoric of the early seventeenth century we see explicit invocation of Anglo-Saxon racialism as the means to make arguments against monarchical power, associating James I and his legacy with Norman invaders.
Circumventing the quagmire of discrimination that has thus far characterized many studies of Howells and minstrelsy, Jarrett discusses the American minstrel tradition of the 1890s as a bridge between racialism and realism that Howells, acting as literary dean, helped to establish.
In the end, as Bovilsky contends, the system of racialism and its "distinctions, distinctions whose effects have been no less real than their grounds, like the literature that represents them, are metaphorical, contradictory, and imagined" (35).
Obviously nothing like that can be said of Haeckel's racialism.