exercise

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Related to range of motion exercise: Passive Range Of Motion

Exercise

To put into action, practice, or force; to make use of something, such as a right or option.

To exercise dominion over land is to openly indicate absolute possession and control.

To exercise discretion is to choose between doing and not doing something, the decision being based on sound judgment.

exercise

(Discharge a function), verb act, administer, carry into execution, carry on, carry out, conduct, do duty, efficere, engage in, execute, exercere, facere, officiate, perform, practice, pursue, put in motion, put into action, put into effect, put into practice, serve as, translate into action, wage
Associated concepts: authority exercised under the United States Constitution, exercise an option, exercise jurisdiccion, exercise of judicial discretion
Foreign phrases: Cui jurisdictio data est, ea quoque connessa esse videntur, sine quibus jurisdictio explicari non potest.To whomsoever jurisdiction is given, those things also are supposed to be granted, without which the jurissiction cannot be exercised. Frustra est potentia quae nunquam venit in actum. A power is a vain one if it is never exercised.

exercise

(Use), verb apply, avail oneself of, bring into play, bring to bear, draw on, employ, make use of, operate, practice, put in action, put in practice, put to use, put to work, turn to account, utilize, wield
Associated concepts: exercise a right to vote, exercise an option, exercise discretion, exercise dominion, exercise due care, exercise of power
See also: act, apply, campaign, commission, discipline, effort, employ, endeavor, enterprise, exert, exploit, labor, officiate, operate, ply, practice, problem, resort, transaction, undertaking, wield, work
References in periodicals archive ?
Shoulder range of motion exercises include "pick an apple," which is reaching up and across the body and back down to the opposite side, and "swing the bat," in which the person holds an imaginary baseball bat on one shoulder and swings it down and across the body.
If the application of compression could effect a faster removal of the plaster, then the earlier commencement of strength and range of motion exercises should further enhance recovery.
Chone Figgins, who has a broken index and middle finger on his right hand, was cleared to start doing range of motion exercises.