References in classic literature ?
he said to himself; "I cannot act like a rational creature for five consecutive minutes.
Much more rational, my dear Caroline, I dare say, but it would not be near so much like a ball.
The appearances, beyond all rational doubt, observed in that case are the appearances observed in Mr.
for he who is intemperate [1260a] and a coward will never do what he ought: it is evident then that both parties ought to be virtuous; but there is a difference between them, as there is between those who by nature command and who by nature obey, and this originates in the soul; for in this nature has planted the governing and submitting principle, the virtues of which we say are different, as are those of a rational and an irrational being.
To Bolkonski so many people appeared contemptible and insignificant creatures, and he so longed to find in someone the living ideal of that perfection toward which he strove, that he readily believed that in Speranski he had found this ideal of a perfectly rational and virtuous man.
And that it had been driven by a rational being must also have occurred to her.
She obstinately refuses, however, to accept this rational view.
Steadily as she persisted in taking the rational view, nevertheless the writing frightened her.
This order of truth, no matter how erroneous it may be, is the sane and normal order of truth, the rational order
The principles of definition, the law of contradiction, the fallacy of arguing in a circle, the distinction between the essence and accidents of a thing or notion, between means and ends, between causes and conditions; also the division of the mind into the rational, concupiscent, and irascible elements, or of pleasures and desires into necessary and unnecessary-- these and other great forms of thought are all of them to be found in the Republic, and were probably first invented by Plato.
If it's rational, you'll be able to keep up the same system with hired labor," said Sviazhsky.
Looming in the distance, as we rode along, was another of the ancient Indian burial-places, called The Monks' Mound; in memory of a body of fanatics of the order of La Trappe, who founded a desolate convent there, many years ago, when there were no settlers within a thousand miles, and were all swept off by the pernicious climate: in which lamentable fatality, few rational people will suppose, perhaps, that society experienced any very severe deprivation.