rear


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Acronyms, Idioms, Wikipedia.
Related to rear: rear guard, rear its head
References in classic literature ?
I ordered the caravan to 'bout face and form in marching order; I then made the tow-rope fast to the rear mule, and gave the command:
Cedric readily assented to what she proposed, and Athelstane only added the condition, ``that they should travel in the rear of the whole party, where Wamba,'' he said, ``might attend them with his shield of boar's brawn.
By careful selection they rear only the hardiest specimens of each species, and with almost supernatural foresight they regulate the birth rate to merely offset the loss by death.
And it was the boy who first saw the rear guard of the caravan and the white men he had been so anxious to overtake.
But, awkwardly enough, the guards now appeared at the rear of the temple, and there installed themselves, in readiness to prevent a surprise.
But if neither time nor place be known, then the left wing will be impotent to succor the right, the right equally impotent to succor the left, the van unable to relieve the rear, or the rear to support the van.
The youth, turning swiftly to make sure that the rear was unmolested, saw the com- mander regarding his men in a highly regretful manner, as if he regretted above everything his association with them.
Himself and the two young men represented the body of the army, whilst Olivain, with his rifle upon his knee and his eyes upon the watch, protected the rear.
Another guard of soldiers, in double rank, brought up the rear.
When they perceived in him signs of exhaustion, and he could no longer be provoked to make battle, they would dismount from their horses, approach him in the rear, and seizing him by the tail, jerk him from side to side, and drag him backward; until the frantic animal, gathering fresh strength from fury, would break from them, and rush, with flashing eyes and a hoarse bellowing, upon any enemy in sight; but in a little while, his transient excitement at an end, would pitch headlong on the ground, and expire.
On this buccaneering expedition, Rear Admiral Du Petit Thouars, leaving the rest of his squadron at the Marquesas,--which had then been occupied by his forces about five months--set sail for the doomed island in the Reine Blanche frigate.
Together they had built the mansion- house, the academy, and the jail, and they alone knew how to plan and rear such a structure as was now required.