rearrest

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In addition, multivariate analyses were limited to felony probationers in Cook County to ascertain which probationer characteristics were associated with on- and post-probation rearrests in that jurisdiction.
Most of the variables that predicted on-probation rearrests for felons in the entire state also predicted on-probation rearrests in Cook County.
However, education level and marital status did have a significant effect on rearrests in the statewide sample.
The fewer rearrests for drug court participants produced significant savings in law enforcement and correctional costs (arrests, bookings, jail time, etc.
108) Accordingly, the Schall and control groups were compared for all rearrests and specifically for violent offenses within ninety days.
Evidently, for all rearrests, judges accurately identified a group of defendants that posed a higher risk of subsequent rearrest during the ninety day period when their cases typically reached conclusion.
For rearrests for any offense, Table 3 shows significant differences only for any rearrest; for violent felonies, differences exist with those current charges.
Rearrests During Six Months Following Release for CEC and DOC Groups Group CEC (n = 176) DOC (n = 241) Percentage Percentage of of n group n group Rearrested in first 11 6.
Records of rearrest, not including technical violations of parole, were obtained through the New Jersey DOC.
The present study compared two sizeable groups of women, released from prison at approximately the same time, who did not differ on variables that have been empirically related to offense risk (age at release) or potentially related to rearrest risk (length of sentence).
Researchers compared the rates of rearrests, reconvictions and reincarcerations for CEC residents who successfully completed the continuum of care process with the rate of rearrests, reconvictions and reincarcerations for offenders who were released into the community from the New Jersey DOC work camps.
The BJS study did not calculate rearrests at a nine-month interval, so no comparison could be made at this time interval.