recession


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See: capitulation, decline, erosion, outflow

RECESSION. A re-grant: the act of returning the title of a country to a government which formerly held it, by one which has it at the time; as the recession of Louisiana, which took place by the treaty between France and Spain, of October 1, 1800. See 2 White's Coll. 516.

References in periodicals archive ?
As can be seen from Table 1, the recent recession was 18 months long, making it the longest of the post-war period.
In this article, I use two approaches to determine whether the seven states of the Tenth District are in a recession.
Tracking state cycles helps clarify the underlying causes of national recessions, (2) informs policymakers regarding appropriate monetary policy, (3) and aids in recognizing in real time an emerging national recession.
3, as a traditional recession and not a double-dip recession.
firms predicting a recession over the next one to three years.
While these numbers are extraordinary in magnitude, placing the Great Recession in the uppermost corner of the chart, they are generally in line with the relationship between GDP and employment during previous recessions.
For many nonprofits a recession is a drawn-out period of painful cuts and adjustments and reductions in revenue and then it's over.
In Long-Term Damage from the Great Recession in OECD countries (NBER Working Paper No.
The Great Recession was significantly associated with a lower incidence of health care utilization (Lusardi, Schneider, and Tufano 2010; Dorn et al.
The falling living standards of millions of families are proof that we're in recession.
The recent economic experience in the United States following the Great Recession (2007:Q4-2009:Q2) has prompted considerable doubts about the nature of Okun's law.
Official figures released yesterday showed the UK is in a double-dip recession - but what impact will it harve for households in the UK?