reform

(redirected from reformer)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to reformer: Social reformer, Hydrogen reformer

reform

noun advancement, alteration, amelioration, amendment, betterment, change, correctio, correction, elevation, emendatio, enhancement, improvement, innovation, melioration, progress, progression, progressivism, recast, reclamation, reconstruction, recovery, recreation, rectification, reformation, regeneration, remaking, renewal, renovation, repair, revision

reform

verb ameliorate, amend, better, change, correct, corrigere, cure, emend, enhance, fix, form anew, improve, make better, make over, meliorate, mend, modify, rearrange, recast, reclaim, reconstitute, rectify, redeem, redo, redress, reestablish, refashion, refine, regenerate, rehabilitate, remake, remedy, remodel, renew, renovate, reorganize, repair, repent, reshape, revise, revolutionize, rework, set straight, uplift
Associated concepts: reform a contract, reform a deed, reeorm a lease, reform a will, reform an instrument
See also: alter, ameliorate, amend, change, convert, correction, development, emend, fix, meliorate, modify, persuade, progress, reconstitute, reconstruct, recreate, rectify, redeem, renew, repair, repent, reproduce, restore, revision, transform

REFORM. To reorganize; to rearrange as, the jury "shall be reformed by putting to and taking out of the persons so impanelled." Stat. 3 H. VIII. c. 12; Bac. Ab. Juries, A.
     2. To reform an instrument in equity, is to make a decree that a deed or other agreement shall be made or construed as it was originally intended by the parties, when an error or mistake as to a fact has been committed. A contract has been reformed, although the party applying to the court was in the legal profession, and he himself drew the contract, it appearing clear that it was framed so as to admit of a construction inconsistent with the true agreement of the parties. 1 Sim. & Stu. 210; 3 Russ. R. 424. But a contract will not be reformed in consequence of an error of law. 1 Russ. & M. 418; 1 Chit. Pr. 124.

References in classic literature ?
Mr Nutt, of the Daily Reformer, wrote some highly incongruous words across the top of the copy, made some highly mysterious marks down the side of it, and called to Miss Barlow in the same loud, monotonous voice: "Take down a letter to Mr Finn.
They delight in getting trustful-souled gentle reformers before them.
If a man is thought-free, fancy-free, imagination-free, that which is not never for a long time appearing to be to him, unwise rulers or reformers cannot fatally interrupt him.
First you wrap a layer or two of blanket around your body, for a sort of cushion and to keep off the cold iron; then you put on your sleeves and shirt of chain mail -- these are made of small steel links woven together, and they form a fabric so flexible that if you toss your shirt onto the floor, it slumps into a pile like a peck of wet fish-net; it is very heavy and is nearly the uncomfortablest material in the world for a night shirt, yet plenty used it for that -- tax collectors, and reformers, and one-horse kings with a defective title, and those sorts of people; then you put on your shoes -- flat-boats roofed over with interleaving bands of steel -- and screw your clumsy spurs into the heels.
Indeed, those who stare at the half-peck of corn a week, and love to count the lashes on the slave's back, are seldom the "stuff" out of which reformers and abolitionists are to be made.
Even in our own days, when morals are better understood, an execution, a bruising match, a riot, or a meeting of radical reformers, collects, at considerable hazard to themselves, immense crowds of spectators, otherwise little interested, except to see how matters are to be conducted, or whether the heroes of the day are, in the heroic language of insurgent tailors, flints or dunghills.
For in what regards manners, every one is so full of his own wisdom, that there might be found as many reformers as heads, if any were allowed to take upon themselves the task of mending them, except those whom God has constituted the supreme rulers of his people or to whom he has given sufficient grace and zeal to be prophets; and although my speculations greatly pleased myself, I believed that others had theirs, which perhaps pleased them still more.
He is serious when he is speaking of his own mission, which seems to distinguish him from all other reformers of mankind, and originates in an accident.
History informs us, likewise, of the difficulties with which these celebrated reformers had to contend, as well as the expedients which they were obliged to employ in order to carry their reforms into effect.
In the first place the historian describes the activity of individuals who in his opinion have directed humanity (one historian considers only monarchs, generals, and ministers as being such men, while another includes also orators, learned men, reformers, philosophers, and poets).
Surely he has learned now that it is very unpleasant to spend one's life with reformers.
Mary Walker and other reformers have done with their coattails