regrets


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References in classic literature ?
Therefore I have read with profound regret, in that article upon the yachting season of a certain year, that the seamanship on board racing yachts is not now what it used to be only a few, very few, years ago.
I don't regret having done what was honourable and right, of course; but I do regret that this should have ever happened--at least sometimes I regret it, and sometimes I --I don't know what I say; I am but a weak girl, Nicholas, and it has agitated me very much.
In the meantime, I cordially regret not having known the local music-seller in early life.
Most of his poems, other than certain political satire, which drew on him the Emperor's wrath, are full of subtle sadness and fragrant regret, reminding one of pot-pourri in some deep blue porcelain bowl.
Bonacieux who was to have paid him the price of his devotedness; but let us hasten to say that this sadness possessed the young man less from the regret of the happiness he had missed, than from the fear he entertained that some serious misfortune had befallen the poor woman.
She endeavoured to persuade herself that she did not regret it; but she could no longer be blind to Miss Bingley's inattention.
I'faith, Aramis, believe me, there is little left to regret.
He was suffering from disappointment and regret, grieving over what was, and wishing for what could never be.
That delightful time, that generous season, that ruling by warm blood, were all very fine things, no doubt; but I do not regret them at all.
Finding that I took an interest in the subject, he expressed a regret that the true nature and extent of his enterprise and its national character and importance had never been understood, and a wish that I would undertake to give an account of it.
She might not wonder, but she must sigh that her father should feel no degradation in his change, should see nothing to regret in the duties and dignity of the resident landholder, should find so much to be vain of in the littlenesses of a town; and she must sigh, and smile, and wonder too, as Elizabeth threw open the folding-doors and walked with exultation from one drawing-room to the other, boasting of their space; at the possibility of that woman, who had been mistress of Kellynch Hall, finding extent to be proud of between two walls, perhaps thirty feet asunder.
He has told me so with a warmth of manner which spoke his regret at having believed the contrary himself.