relations


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Idioms, Encyclopedia.
See: blood, dealings, kindred, next of kin

RELATIONS, kindred. In its most extensive signification, this term includes all the kindred of the person spoken of. In a more limited sense, it signifies those persons who are entitled as next of kin under the statute of distribution.
     2. A legacy to "relations" generally, or to "relations by blood or marriage," without enumerating any of them, will, therefore, entitle to a share, such of the testator's relatives as would be entitled under the statute of distribution's in the event of intestacy. 1 Madd. Ch. R. 45; 1 Bro. C. C. 33. See the cases referred to under the word Relations, article Construction.
     3. Relations to either of the parties, even beyond the ninth degree, have been holden incapable to serve on juries. 3 Chit. Pr. 795, note c.
     4. Relationship or affinity is no objection to a witness, unless in the case of husband and wife. See Witness.

References in classic literature ?
It frequently happens that the relations of the criminal are for taking the like vengeance for his death, and sometimes pursue this resolution so far that all those who had any share in the prosecution lose their lives.
This discretion, in regard to criminal causes, is abridged by the express injunction of trial by jury in all such cases; but it is, of course, left at large in relation to civil causes, there being a total silence on this head.
At a certain stage in the development of these means of production and of exchange, the conditions under which feudal society produced and exchanged, the feudal organisation of agriculture and manufacturing industry, in one word, the feudal relations of property became no longer compatible with the already developed productive forces; they became so many fetters.
And in the wretched state of his own finances, there was a very powerful motive for secrecy, in addition to his fear of discovery by Lydia's relations, for it had just transpired that he had left gaming debts behind him to a very considerable amount.
I learned that she had been assassinated by my relation, aided by four friends, but I was already aware that I had been robbed of my wealth and degraded from my nobility by King Charles I.
The sensible things are not realities, but shadows only, in relation to the truth.
In the case of the misseltoe, which draws its nourishment from certain trees, which has seeds that must be transported by certain birds, and which has flowers with separate sexes absolutely requiring the agency of certain insects to bring pollen from one flower to the other, it is equally preposterous to account for the structure of this parasite, with its relations to several distinct organic beings, by the effects of external conditions, or of habit, or of the volition of the plant itself.
The introduction to this felicity is in a private and tender relation of one to one, which is the enchantment of human life; which, like a certain divine rage and enthusiasm, seizes on man at one period and works a revolution in his mind and body; unites him to his race, pledges him to the domestic and civic relations, carries him with new sympathy into nature, enhances the power of the senses, opens the imagination, adds to his character heroic and sacred attributes, establishes marriage, and gives permanence to human society.
But I think the person is not an ingredient in the single thought: he is rather constituted by relations of the thoughts to each other and to the body.
And now as she made surmises as to who people were, what were their relations to one another, and what they were like, Kitty endowed them with the most marvelous and noble characters, and found confirmation of her idea in her observations.
The poor relations had kept in bed all day, with the view of attaining the same happy consummation, but, as they had been unsuccessful, they stopped there.
In order to ascertain the real character of the government, it may be considered in relation to the foundation on which it is to be established; to the sources from which its ordinary powers are to be drawn; to the operation of those powers; to the extent of them; and to the authority by which future changes in the government are to be introduced.