remote


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remote

adj., adv. extremely far off or slight. Evidence may be so remote from the issues in a trial that it will not be allowed as "immaterial." An act which started the events which led to an accident may be too remote to be a cause, as distinguished from the "proximate cause." Example: While Doug Driver is passing a corner a friend calls out to him causing him to look away, and then Doug looks back and in the middle of the block is hit by a truck backing out of a driveway. The momentary inattention is not a cause of the injury, and is called a "remote cause." (See: immaterial, proximate cause)

remote

(Not proximate), adjective at a great dissance, distant, far, far-off, far removed, indirect, not immeeiate, remotus, removed
Associated concepts: remote cause, remote damages
Foreign phrases: Id quod est magis remotum, non trahit ad se quod est magis junctum, sed e contrario in omni casu.That which is more remote does not draw to itself that which is more proximate but the contrary in every case.

remote

(Secluded), adjective alone, apart, curtained, detached, disassociated, distant, far, far-off, faraway, hidden, inaccessible, insular, isolated, not close, not near, not nearby, out of the way, private, remote, removed, seclusive, segregated, separated, sequestered, shut away, solitary, unassociated, unconnected, unfrequented

remote

(Small), adjective diminutive, faint, in small amount, inappreciable, inconsequential, inconsiderable, insubstantial, little, minimal, minute, scant, slight, slim, small, superficial, tiny, trivial, unessential, unimportant
See also: foreign, immaterial, impertinent, inaccessible, inapposite, inappropriate, inconsequential, irrelevant, private, solitary, unapproachable

REMOTE. At a distance; afar off, not immediate. A remote cause is not in general sufficient to charge a man with the commission of a crime, nor with being the author of a tort.
     2. When a man suffers an injury in consequence of the violation of a contract, he is in general entitled to damages for the violation of such contract, but not for remote consequences, unconnected with the contract, to which he may be subjected; as, for example, if the maker of a promissory note should not pay it at maturity; the holder will be entitled to damages arising from the breach of the contract, namely, the principal and interest; but should the holder, in consequence of the non-payment of such note, be compelled to stop payment, and lose his credit and his business, the maker will not be responsible for such losses, on account of the great remoteness of the cause; so if an agent who is bound to account should neglect to do so, and a similar failure should take place, the agent would not be responsible for the damages thus caused. 1 Brock. Cir. C. R. 103; see 3 Pet. 69, 84, 89; 5 Mason's R. 161; 3 Wheat. 560; 1 Story, R. 157; 3 Sumn. R. 27, 270; 2 Sm. & Marsh. 340; 7 Hill, 61. Vide Cause.

References in classic literature ?
A natural spring of soft and pleasant water--a rare treasure on the sea-girt peninsula where the Puritan settlement was made--had early induced Matthew Maule to build a hut, shaggy with thatch, at this point, although somewhat too remote from what was then the centre of the village.
As he talked along, softly, pleasantly, flowingly, he seemed to drift away imperceptibly out of this world and time, and into some remote era and old forgotten country; and so he gradually wove such a spell about me that I seemed to move among the specters and shadows and dust and mold of a gray antiquity, holding speech with a relic of it
Now the view broadens; through the gateway of the sentinel headlands you gaze out over the wide Rhine plain, which stretches away, softly and richly tinted, grows gradually and dreamily indistinct, and finally melts imperceptibly into the remote horizon.
Some were from Jupiter and other worlds in our own system, but the most celebrated were three poets, Saa, Bo and Soof, from great planets in three different and very remote systems.
Having suspected from the first that there was a gentleman in the background, it is highly satisfactory to know that he recedes into the remote perspective of Asia.
I came into the valley, as the evening sun was shining on the remote heights of snow, that closed it in, like eternal clouds.
As, unfortunately, the Queen's highway ran down in tortuous descent to the handful of fishermen's cottages that had clung there limpet-like for ages, there was always a chance of such a stray visitation; but it was remote, and the whole place, hand and heart, was in the pocket of my lord.
It is easy for us who travel into remote countries, which are seldom visited by Englishmen or other Europeans, to form descriptions of wonderful animals both at sea and land.
Has it not, on the contrary, invariably been found that momentary passions, and immediate interest, have a more active and imperious control over human conduct than general or remote considerations of policy, utility or justice?
As the natural limit of a democracy is that distance from the central point which will just permit the most remote citizens to assemble as often as their public functions demand, and will include no greater number than can join in those functions; so the natural limit of a republic is that distance from the centre which will barely allow the representatives to meet as often as may be necessary for the administration of public affairs.
While he spoke, the lady Madeline (for so was she called) passed slowly through a remote portion of the apartment, and, without having noticed my presence, disappeared.
It was agreed that I was to hold down our claim against the remote possibility of its being jumped by some wandering prospector.