remote

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remote

adj., adv. extremely far off or slight. Evidence may be so remote from the issues in a trial that it will not be allowed as "immaterial." An act which started the events which led to an accident may be too remote to be a cause, as distinguished from the "proximate cause." Example: While Doug Driver is passing a corner a friend calls out to him causing him to look away, and then Doug looks back and in the middle of the block is hit by a truck backing out of a driveway. The momentary inattention is not a cause of the injury, and is called a "remote cause." (See: immaterial, proximate cause)

remote

(Not proximate), adjective at a great dissance, distant, far, far-off, far removed, indirect, not immeeiate, remotus, removed
Associated concepts: remote cause, remote damages
Foreign phrases: Id quod est magis remotum, non trahit ad se quod est magis junctum, sed e contrario in omni casu.That which is more remote does not draw to itself that which is more proximate but the contrary in every case.

remote

(Secluded), adjective alone, apart, curtained, detached, disassociated, distant, far, far-off, faraway, hidden, inaccessible, insular, isolated, not close, not near, not nearby, out of the way, private, remote, removed, seclusive, segregated, separated, sequestered, shut away, solitary, unassociated, unconnected, unfrequented

remote

(Small), adjective diminutive, faint, in small amount, inappreciable, inconsequential, inconsiderable, insubstantial, little, minimal, minute, scant, slight, slim, small, superficial, tiny, trivial, unessential, unimportant
See also: foreign, immaterial, impertinent, inaccessible, inapposite, inappropriate, inconsequential, irrelevant, private, solitary, unapproachable

REMOTE. At a distance; afar off, not immediate. A remote cause is not in general sufficient to charge a man with the commission of a crime, nor with being the author of a tort.
     2. When a man suffers an injury in consequence of the violation of a contract, he is in general entitled to damages for the violation of such contract, but not for remote consequences, unconnected with the contract, to which he may be subjected; as, for example, if the maker of a promissory note should not pay it at maturity; the holder will be entitled to damages arising from the breach of the contract, namely, the principal and interest; but should the holder, in consequence of the non-payment of such note, be compelled to stop payment, and lose his credit and his business, the maker will not be responsible for such losses, on account of the great remoteness of the cause; so if an agent who is bound to account should neglect to do so, and a similar failure should take place, the agent would not be responsible for the damages thus caused. 1 Brock. Cir. C. R. 103; see 3 Pet. 69, 84, 89; 5 Mason's R. 161; 3 Wheat. 560; 1 Story, R. 157; 3 Sumn. R. 27, 270; 2 Sm. & Marsh. 340; 7 Hill, 61. Vide Cause.

References in classic literature ?
As he talked along, softly, pleasantly, flowingly, he seemed to drift away imperceptibly out of this world and time, and into some remote era and old forgotten country; and so he gradually wove such a spell about me that I seemed to move among the specters and shadows and dust and mold of a gray antiquity, holding speech with a relic of it
When I heard the voices die away, and saw the quiet evening cloud grow dim, and all the colours in the valley fade, and the golden snow upon the mountain-tops become a remote part of the pale night sky, yet felt that the night was passing from my mind, and all its shadows clearing, there was no name for the love I bore her, dearer to me, henceforward, than ever until then.
I shall say nothing of those remote nations where YAHOOS preside; among which the least corrupted are the BROBDINGNAGIANS; whose wise maxims in morality and government it would be our happiness to observe.
Is it not time to awake from the deceitful dream of a golden age, and to adopt as a practical maxim for the direction of our political conduct that we, as well as the other inhabitants of the globe, are yet remote from the happy empire of perfect wisdom and perfect virtue?
Passing by France and Spain, we find that in Great Britain, inferior as it may be in size, the representatives of the northern extremity of the island have as far to travel to the national council as will be required of those of the most remote parts of the Union.
I found a large chamber, possibly a hundred feet in diameter and thirty or forty feet in height; a smooth and well-worn floor, and many other evidences that the cave had, at some remote period, been inhabited.
The sky was clear, remote, and empty save for a few horizontal bars far down in the sunset.
That last stage of exhaustion, which to us is still incredibly remote, has become a present- day problem for the inhabitants of Mars.
But nothing contributes more to produce a clearness of diction that is remote from commonness than the lengthening, contraction, and alteration of words.
A man is also said to 'have' a wife, and a wife a husband, and this appears to be the most remote meaning of the term, for by the use of it we mean simply that the husband lives with the wife.
Messages soon came one after another to the house where I was, to inform me the mob were coming in pursuit of me, and I was obliged to retire through yards and gardens to a house more remote, where I remained until
When the American enters on the history of his ancestors, he is driven, after some ten or twelve generations at most, to seek refuge in a country in Europe; whereas exactly the reverse is the case with us, our most remote extraction being American, while our more recent construction and education have taken place in Europe.