rent


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rent

1) v. to hire an object or real property for a period of time (or for an open-ended term) for specified payments. 2) n. the amount paid by the renter and received by the owner. Rent may be specified in a written lease, but also may be based on an oral agreement for either a short period or on a month-to-month basis in which the hiring may be terminated on a month's notice. (See: lease)

rent

noun assessment, compensation, cost, fee, income from real estate, land revenue, merces, proceeds, reditus, remuneration, rental, return, revenue
Associated concepts: action for rent, assignment of rent, ejectment, fair rent, fair rental value, holdover, month-tooonth rental, prepayment of rent, reasonable rent, rent strike, rents and proceeds, security, suit for rent, tenancy by will, unaccrued rent

rent

verb allow residency, allow the use of, charter, conducere, contract, demise, enjoy the use of premises, ennage, give occupation, grant a lease, hire out, lease, lend, let, let out, locare, make available, sublease, sublet, take a lease, underlease, underlet, use premises
Associated concepts: option to rent
See also: charge, cost, lease, let, rift, schism, split, sublease, sublet

rent

the sum or amount agreed in the lease or tenancy agreement to be paid by the tenant to the landlord for exclusive possession of the property leased for the period of the lease. The same term maybe used for the charge for use of moveables such as a motor vehicle.

RENT, estates, contracts. A certain profit in money, provisions, chattels, or labor, issuing out of lands and tenements in retribution for the use. 2 Bl. Com. 41; 14 Pet. Rep. 526; Gilb., on Rents, 9; Co. Litt. 142 a; Civ. Code of Lo. art. 2750; Com. on L. & T. 95; 1 Kent, Com. 367; Bradb. on Distr. 24; Bac. Ab. h.t.; Crabb, R. P. SSSS 149-258.
     2. A rent somewhat resembles an annuity, (q.v.) their difference consists in the fact that the former issues out of lands, and the latter is a mere personal charge.
     3. At common law there were three kinds of rents; namely, rent-service, rent-charge, and rent-seek. When the tenant held his land by fealty or other corporeal service, and a certain rent, this was called rent-service; a right of distress was inseparably incident to this rent.
     4. A rent-charge is when the rent is created by deed and the fee granted; and as there is no fealty annexed to such a grant of rent, the right of distress is not in incident; and it requires an express power of distress to be annexed to the grant, which gives it the name of a rent- charge, because the lands are, by the deed, charged with a distress. Co. Litt. 143 b.
     5. Rent-seek, or a dry or barren rent, was rent reserves by deed, without a clause of distress, and in a case in which the owner of the rent had no future interest or reversion in the land, he was driven for a remedy to a writ of annuity or writ of assize.
     6. But the statute of 4 Geo. II. c. 28, abolished all distinction in the several kinds of rent, so far as to give the remedy by distress in cases of rents-seek, rents of assize, and chief rents, as in the case of rents reserved upon a lease. In Pennsylvania, a distress is inseparably incident to every species of rent that may be reduced to a certainty. 2 Rawle's Rep. 13. In New York, it seems the remedy by distress exists for all kinds of rent. 3 Kent Com. 368. Vide Distress; 18 Viner's Abr. 472; Woodf, L. & T. 184 Gilb. on Rents Com. Dig. h.t.. Dane's Ab. Index, h.t.
     7. As to the time when the rent becomes due, it is proper to observe, that there is a distinction to be made. It becomes due for the purpose of making a demand to take advantage of a condition of reentry, or to tender it to save a forfeiture, at sunset of the day on which it is due: but it is not actually due till midnight, for any other purpose. An action could not be supported which had been commenced on the day it became due, although commenced after sunset; and if the owner of the fee died between sunset and midnight of that day, the heir and not the executor would be entitled to the rent. 1 Saund. 287; 10 Co. 127 b; 2 Madd. Ch. R. 268; 1 P. Wms. 177; S. C. 1 Salk, 578. See generally, Bac. Ab. h.t.; Bouv. Inst. Index h.t.; and Distress; Reentry.

References in classic literature ?
And on top of that he would have a month's rent paid in advance on the type-writer and on the room.
Also, I rent two rooms in workingmen's houses in different quarters of the city.
Many a man is harassed to death to pay the rent of a larger and more luxurious box who would not have frozen to death in such a box as this.
An annual rent of from twenty-five to a hundred dollars
If we suppose him to pay a rent instead, this is but a doubtful choice of evils.
All this I had, of course, heard tell of; and now I had a man under my eyes whose life was forfeit on all these counts and upon one more, for he was not only a rebel and a smuggler of rents, but had taken service with King Louis of France.
Sawyer,' said the little, fierce woman, trying to appear very calm, 'if you'll have the kindness to settle that little bill of mine I'll thank you, because I've got my rent to pay this afternoon, and my landlord's a-waiting below now.
Raddle, elevating her voice for the information of the neighbours--'do you suppose that I'm a-going day after day to let a fellar occupy my lodgings as never thinks of paying his rent, nor even the very money laid out for the fresh butter and lump sugar that's bought for his breakfast, and the very milk that's took in, at the street door?
Ain't it enough to be swindled out of one's rent, and money lent out of pocket besides, and abused and insulted by your friends that dares to call themselves men, without having the house turned out of the window, and noise enough made to bring the fire-engines here, at two o'clock in the morning?
His Majesty's revenues are seldom collected in this happy valley; the rents are dubious; and the water communication is very frequently cut off.
There are tremendous sarcasms against a landlord not a hundred miles from Middlemarch, who receives his own rents, and makes no returns.
all this is about a landlord not a hundred miles from Middlemarch, who receives his own rents.