renunciation

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Renunciation

The Abandonment of a right; repudiation; rejection.

The renunciation of a right, power, or privilege involves a total divestment thereof; the right, power, or privilege cannot be transferred to anyone else. For example, when an individual becomes a citizen of a new country, that individual must ordinarily renounce his or her citizenship in the old country.

renunciation

n. 1) giving up a right, such as a right of inheritance, a gift under a will, or abandoning the right to collect a debt on a note. 2) in criminal law, abandoning participation in a crime before it takes place, or an attempt to stop other participants from going ahead with the crime. A defendant may use renunciation as evidence of his/her innocence. Once the crime is underway, any claimed renunciation is factually too late.

renunciation

noun abandonment, abdicatio, abjuration, abnegation, cancellation, cession, demission, denial, disaffirmation, disallowance, disapproval, disavowal, disavowment, discard, disclaimer, discontinuance, disinheritance, disownment, elimination, exclusion, forswearing, giving up, negation, omission, proscription, rebuff, refusal, rejection, relinquishment, reprobation, repudiatio, repudiation, repulsion, retraction, sacrifice, shutting out, spurning, swearing off, veto, waiver, withdrawal, yielding
Associated concepts: renunciation of a contract, renunciation of a will
See also: abandonment, abdication, abjuration, ademption, cancellation, confutation, continence, declination, denial, desertion, disclaimer, disdain, expense, rebuff, refusal, rejection, relinquishment, repudiation, rescision, resignation, retraction, reversal, sacrifice, waiver

RENUNCIATION. The act of giving up a right.
     2. It is a rule of law that any one may renounce a right which the law has established in his favor. To this maxim there are many limitations. A party may always renounce an acquired right; as, for example, to take lands by descent; but one cannot always give up a future right, before it has accrued, nor to the benefit conferred by law, although such advantage may be introduced only for the benefit of individuals.
     3. For example, the power of making a will; the right of annulling a future contract, on the ground of fraud; and the right of pleading the act of limitations, cannot be renounced. The first, because the party must be left free to make a will or not; and the latter two, because the right has not yet accrued.
     4. This term is usually employed to signify the abdication or giving up of one's country at the time of choosing another. The act of congress requires from a foreigner who applies to become naturalized a renunciation of all allegiance and fidelity to any foreign prince, potentate, state or sovereignty, whereof such alien may, at the time, be a citizen or subject. See Citizen; Expatriation; Naturalization; To renounce.