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Report

An official or formal statement of facts or proceedings. To give an account of; to relate; to tell or convey information; the written statement of such an account.For example, one kind of report is the formal statement in writing made to a court by a master, a clerk, or a referee who has been appointed to inquire into a particular matter for the court. Sometimes the report of a public official is distinguished from a return. A return typically discloses something done or observed by the official, whereas a report shows the results of an investigation into matters outside the personal knowledge of the official.

Regularly published volumes of books containing accounts of decisions and opinions of various courts are sometimes referred to as reports, but more often they are called reporters.

The Annual Report for stockholders is prepared by a corporation, a consumer report describes the qualities of a manufactured product, and a credit report assesses the creditworthiness of a business or consumer for a bank or other lender.

report

(Detailed account), noun account, address, brief, broadcast, bulletin, chronicle, communication, criticism, description, digest, disclosure, dissemination, history, information, intelligence, manifesto, message, minute, narration, news, news story, note, notification, proclamation, propagation, recital, recitation, record, recounting, relatio, relation, release, renuntiatio, revelation, review, saga, specification, statement, summary, talk, tidings, ventilation
Associated concepts: accident report, grand jury report

report

(Rumor), noun bruit, fama, gossip, grapevine, hearsay, hint, intimation, scuttlebutt, talk, tattle, unconnirmed report, unverified news, whisper

report

(Disclose), verb acquaint, adferre, advise, air, announce, annunciate, apprise, broadcast, bruit, circulate publicly, communicate, declare, deliver information, detail, disseminate, divulgate, divulge, enlighten, expose, expound, express, give an account of, give the facts, herald, impart, inform, make an announcement, make known, mention, notify, outline, proclaim, promulgate, publish, recite, recount, referre, renuntiare, report, reveal, set forth, speak about, specify, state, tell, testify to, unmask, voice, write up

report

(Present oneself), verb announce one's pressnce, answer, answer a summons, appear, appear for duty, arrive, attend, be at hand, be in attendance, check in, come, comparere, fulfill an engagement, meet, present oneself, put in an appearance, reveal oneself, show oneself
See also: annunciate, apprise, betray, bill, book, canvass, clue, comment, communicate, communication, conclusion, convey, delineate, delineation, depict, detail, determination, disabuse, disclose, disclosure, dispatch, disseminate, divulge, document, enlighten, enter, entry, file, finding, form, hearsay, herald, holding, inform, intelligence, invoice, issuance, judgment, memorandum, mention, message, narration, narrative, news, notice, notification, notify, observation, opinion, outline, portray, post, proclaim, promulgate, pronouncement, propagate, publication, publicity, publish, quote, recital, recite, record, recount, reference, relate, rendition, repeat, repercussion, representation, reputation, review, scenario, signify, speak, spread, statement, story, summary, synopsis, tell, tip

report

a written account of a decided case giving the main points of the argument on each side, the court's findings, and the decision reached. See also RUBRIC.

REPORT, legislation. A statement made by a committee to a legislative assembly, of facts of which they were charged to inquire.

REPORT, practice. A certificate to the court made by a master in chancery, commissioner or other person appointed by the court, of the facts or matters to be ascertained by him, or of something of which it is his duty to inform the court.
     2. If the parties in the case accede to the report, find no exceptions are filed, it is in due time confirmed; if exceptions are filed to the report, they will, agreeably to the rules of the court, be heard, and the report will either be confirmed, set aside, or referred. back for the correction of some error. 2 Madd. Ch. 505; Blake's Ch. Pr. 230; Vin. Ab. h.t.

References in periodicals archive ?
Because reported speech is placed in slot B and because the naturalness scale cannot be extended to the right in this particular case, reported speech exemplifies an extremely unnatural environment.
Reported speech is either direct or indirect reported speech.
Kerge (1979) has viewed this problem in relation with reported speech and drawn the line between the first and the second person--it is impossible to refer to someone else's thoughts unless they have been voiced.
This statement is supported by a sudden increase in the use of reported speech which had probably been the basis for the emergence and spreading of the adessive indirectal that first occurs in the material of the 1970s.
The semantic change from reported speech to doubt is a regular cross-linguistic pattern that has been widely commented on in grammaticized evidential systems.
While research on the relationship between reported speech and doubt has been focused on languages with grammaticized evidential systems, this relationship is not limited to such languages.
What follows this statement is all reported speech, if we follow the frame, which will jump us from the back porch to Janie's story.
Spanish-English grammatical contact in Los Angeles: The grammar of reported speech in the East Los Angeles contact vernacular.
Investigation of reported speech does indeed turn out to be rewarding within the selected genre, as its usage in romances exceeds 50% in some of the samples included in the Helsinki Corpus.
of Poznan, Poland) contributes not only direct information about reported speech and discourse in early modern English courtrooms, but also some analytic tools and linguistic insights relevant for such a study.
Then we could bore each other to death with reported speech and past participles and the need to use a dictionary to check spellings.
Looking at pronouns, tense aspect, and the layering of voices in reported speech, he finds that non-native speakers adopt form-function mappings from their mother tongue, as he rather expected when he started the study.