repudiate

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repudiate

verb abandon, abdicate, abjure, abnegate, abolish, abrogate, cancel, change sides, contradict, countermand, declare null and void, decline, default, demur, deny, disallow, disannul, disavow, disbar, discard, dishonor, dissent, dissolve, exclude, forswear, negate, neglect, nullify, override, overrule, proscribe, protest, recant, refuse to accept, refuse to acknowledge, reicere, reject, repeal, repudiare, retract, reverse, revoke, set aside, spurn, withdraw
Associated concepts: repudiate a cause of action, repudiate a contract
See also: abandon, abolish, abrogate, adeem, annul, answer, blame, cancel, challenge, condemn, contemn, contradict, controvert, cross, decline, default, defect, demur, deny, deprecate, disaccord, disagree, disallow, disapprove, disavow, disclaim, disdain, dishonor, disinherit, disobey, disoblige, disown, dissent, except, exclude, forfeit, forswear, gainsay, ignore, invalidate, leave, negate, nullify, object, oust, overrule, picket, prohibit, proscribe, protest, rebut, recall, recant, refuse, refute, reject, relinquish, renounce, repel, reply, repulse, rescind, resign, revoke, secede, set aside, spurn, waive

TO REPUDIATE. To repudiate a right is to express in a sufficient manner, a determination not to accept it, when it is offered.
     2. He who repudiates a right cannot by that act transfer it to another. Repudiation differs from renunciation in this, that by the former he who repudiates simply declares that he will not accept, while he who renounces a right does so in favor of another. Renunciation is however sometimes used in the sense of repudiation. See To Renounce; Renunciation; Wolff, Inst. 339.

References in periodicals archive ?
Thomas Kuehn's Heirs, Kin, and Creditors analyzes the repudiation of inheritance by Florentines from the fourteenth to the sixteenth centuries.
Kuehn argues that reading repudiation as an act of individualism against family obligations or conversely as an act of "some Renaissance era Tuscan version of 'amoral familialism'" (213) against social and legal obligations is too simplistic.
Having first outlined the legal history and framework of repudiation, and traced Florentine attitudes toward inheritance as well as occurrences of repudiation in family records (the ubiquitous ricordanze kept by so many moneyed Florentines), Kuehn devotes the second half of the book to analyzing the data from the governmental and notarial records.
The repudiation of Caterina, a nun at San Niccolo of Prato (so, in fact, the repudiation of the entire convent), recorded by the notary noted that Gostanza had no other dowry or prospect of having a dowry unless she received her grandmother's estate (163-64).
Baldwin assesses the costs, arguing that, in order for one to perform repudiations, "one has to blot so much out of the mind - and the heart - that this hatred itself becomes an exhausting and self-destructive pose .
The failure to acknowledge the complexity of historical experience in Faulkner's narratives of repudiation points to the central importance of the process delineated in Baldwin's Just Above My Head:
Power clears the passage, swiftly: but the paradox, here, is that power, rooted in history, is also the mockery and the repudiation of history.
Anyone who has seen a movie in an all-black cinema has witnessed the communally improvised, fluid repudiation of the hierarchical division between artist, artifact, and audience.