repugnance


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The prince, who had a great repugnance to treat with such an ill-bred fellow, made out a list, against the grain, and sent it.
Though no longer bound by engagements to continue in the interior, they have become so accustomed to the freedom of the forest and the prairie, that they look back with repugnance upon the restraints of civilization.
Upon recovering, my first impulse, of course, was to inform my friend of what I had seen and heard -- and I can scarcely explain what feeling of repugnance it was which, in the end, operated to prevent me.
The great majority of habitual drinkers are born not only without desire for alcohol, but with actual repugnance toward it.
She recalled the efforts she had made at first to overcome the repugnance she felt for him, as for all consumptive people, and the pains it had cost her to think of things to say to him.
Even had there been no bitter recollections, nor any hostile interest now at stake between them, the mere natural repugnance of the more sensitive system to the massive, weighty, and unimpressible one, must, in itself, have been disastrous to the former.
This figure of her wretched brother would go wandering through the city, attracting all eyes, and everybody's wonder and repugnance, like a ghost, the more to be shuddered at because visible at noontide.
The abhorrence in which I held the man, the dread I had of him, the repugnance with which I shrank from him, could not have been exceeded if he had been some terrible beast.
Oh," said Morcerf, "this repugnance, if repugnance it may be called, is not all on my side.
In his opinion, the existence of my child would excite a moral repugnance, in comparison with which the question of money would be as nought, and the whole affair would be broken off at once, and he was right.
But I believe that all the trying in the world to benefit a child, and all the substantial favors you can do them, will never excite one emotion of gratitude, while that feeling of repugnance remains in the heart;--it's a queer kind of a fact,--but so it is.
He must be gone within a few hours, though without feeling any real alarm for his aunt, to lessen his repugnance.