reputation


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Related to reputation: good reputation

reputation

n. a person's good name, honor and what the community thinks of him/her. The quality and value of one's reputation is a key issue in suits for defamation (libel and slander) since the damage to one's reputation by published untruths may determine the amount of judgment against the defamer. Sometimes a person's reputation is so great that most defamation cannot do him/her much harm. (See: defamation, libel, slander)

reputation

noun acclaim, celebration, celebrity, credit, distinction, eminence, esteem, estimation, fama, fame, famousness, glory, good name, illustriousness, importance, luster, mark, name, notability, note, notoriety, opinio, popular favor, position, position in society, preeminence, prestige, prominence, rank, regard, renown, report, repute, respect, respectability, standing, status
Associated concepts: character witness, reputation evidence
See also: credit, notoriety, prestige, recognition, regard

REPUTATION, evidence. The opinion generally entertained by persons who know another, as to his character, (q.v.) or it is the opinion generally entertained by person; who know a family as to its pedigree, and the like.
     2. In general, reputation is evidence to prove, 1st. A man's character in society. 2d. A pedigree. (q.v.) 3d. Certain prescriptive or customary rights and obligations and matters of public notoriety. (q.v.) But as such evidence is in its own nature very weak, it must be supported. 1st. When it relates to the exercise of the right or privilege, by proof of acts of enjoyment of such right or privilege, within the period of living memory; 1 Maule & Selw. 679; 5 T. R. 32; afterwards evidence of reputation may be given. 2d. The fact must be of a public nature. 3d. It must be derived from persons likely to know the facts. 4th. The facts must be general and, not particular. 5th. They must be free from suspicion. 1 Stark. Ev. 54 to 65. Vide 1 Har. & M'H. 152; 2 Nott & M'C. 114 5 Day, R. 290; 4 Hen. & M. 507; 1 Tayl. R. 121; 2 Hayw. 3; 8 S. & R. 159; 4 John. R. 52; 18 John. R. 346; 9 Mass. R. 414; 4 Burr. 2057; Dougl. 174; Cowp. 594; 3 Swanst. 400; Dudl. So. Car. R. 346; and arts. Character; Memory.

References in classic literature ?
A hard, cold man, thus unfortunately situated, seldom or never looking inward, and resolutely taking his idea of himself from what purports to be his image as reflected in the mirror of public opinion, can scarcely arrive at true self-knowledge, except through loss of property and reputation.
No poet who valued his reputation would touch such a theme as that.
It tickles the barkeeper till he can't rest, it makes a charming lark for the young folks, it don't do anybody any harm, it don't cost a rap, and it keeps up the place's reputation for making all comers happy and content.
With Scotch patience and pluck he resolved to live down his reputation and work his way into the legal field yet.
Few are willing to incur the odium attaching to the reputation of being a cruel master; and above all things, they would not be known as not giving a slave enough to eat.
The emperor was anxious to see that famous temple of the Rotunda, called in ancient times the temple 'of all the gods,' but now-a-days, by a better nomenclature, 'of all the saints,' which is the best preserved building of all those of pagan construction in Rome, and the one which best sustains the reputation of mighty works and magnificence of its founders.
The sole and undivided responsibility of one man will naturally beget a livelier sense of duty and a more exact regard to reputation.
The inference which naturally results from these considerations is this, that the President and senators so chosen will always be of the number of those who best understand our national interests, whether considered in relation to the several States or to foreign nations, who are best able to promote those interests, and whose reputation for integrity inspires and merits confidence.
This book, highly approved of in the learned world, gained for me a special reputation in this rather obscure branch of Natural History.
A principality is created either by the people or by the nobles, accordingly as one or other of them has the opportunity; for the nobles, seeing they cannot withstand the people, begin to cry up the reputation of one of themselves, and they make him a prince, so that under his shadow they can give vent to their ambitions.
Hence his victories bring him neither reputation for wisdom nor credit for courage.
Everything is ruined--my reputation, my self-respect, all that I have in the world