reputation

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reputation

n. a person's good name, honor and what the community thinks of him/her. The quality and value of one's reputation is a key issue in suits for defamation (libel and slander) since the damage to one's reputation by published untruths may determine the amount of judgment against the defamer. Sometimes a person's reputation is so great that most defamation cannot do him/her much harm. (See: defamation, libel, slander)

reputation

noun acclaim, celebration, celebrity, credit, distinction, eminence, esteem, estimation, fama, fame, famousness, glory, good name, illustriousness, importance, luster, mark, name, notability, note, notoriety, opinio, popular favor, position, position in society, preeminence, prestige, prominence, rank, regard, renown, report, repute, respect, respectability, standing, status
Associated concepts: character witness, reputation evidence
See also: credit, notoriety, prestige, recognition, regard

REPUTATION, evidence. The opinion generally entertained by persons who know another, as to his character, (q.v.) or it is the opinion generally entertained by person; who know a family as to its pedigree, and the like.
     2. In general, reputation is evidence to prove, 1st. A man's character in society. 2d. A pedigree. (q.v.) 3d. Certain prescriptive or customary rights and obligations and matters of public notoriety. (q.v.) But as such evidence is in its own nature very weak, it must be supported. 1st. When it relates to the exercise of the right or privilege, by proof of acts of enjoyment of such right or privilege, within the period of living memory; 1 Maule & Selw. 679; 5 T. R. 32; afterwards evidence of reputation may be given. 2d. The fact must be of a public nature. 3d. It must be derived from persons likely to know the facts. 4th. The facts must be general and, not particular. 5th. They must be free from suspicion. 1 Stark. Ev. 54 to 65. Vide 1 Har. & M'H. 152; 2 Nott & M'C. 114 5 Day, R. 290; 4 Hen. & M. 507; 1 Tayl. R. 121; 2 Hayw. 3; 8 S. & R. 159; 4 John. R. 52; 18 John. R. 346; 9 Mass. R. 414; 4 Burr. 2057; Dougl. 174; Cowp. 594; 3 Swanst. 400; Dudl. So. Car. R. 346; and arts. Character; Memory.

References in periodicals archive ?
The ranking of reputational drivers seems to follow reputation crises in various industries.
Our Reputational Value Metrics allow an almost real-time measurement of reputational value," Gerken said.
If you are not financially strong enough to survive reputational injury, do you have all the protection you need in your insurance program for the often overlooked risks that could affect your ability to compete?
In developing a strategy for managing reputational risk, companies therefore must use a multifaceted approach.
When faced with a reputational crisis, these measures of the company's reputation compiled under normal business circumstances can be the standard to test the extent to which a crisis event has damaged the company's reputation, as well as the calculus to measure efforts to rebuild trust, confidence and client satisfaction.
Litigation's Impact on Reputational Sanctions: Towards a Novel
Conversely, reputational hits erode firms'business objectives, forcing them to play a game of catch-up.
However, an alarmingly high number--43 percent--of the survey's respondents said they were not prepared for reputational risk events.
Mr Grieve said: "Whilst we can pull out very easily from the European Convention on Human Rights if we wanted to, there would be serious reputational issues if we were to do it.
MANILA -- Local banks could be penalized if they failed to comply with disclosure rules on their dealings with American citizens, which could expose lenders to legal and reputational risks.
Businesses are focusing more on reputational risk today than in the past.
Businesses are placing an increased focus on reputational risk as a result of market demands for transparency, reputational failures and the rise of social media.