reputation

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reputation

n. a person's good name, honor and what the community thinks of him/her. The quality and value of one's reputation is a key issue in suits for defamation (libel and slander) since the damage to one's reputation by published untruths may determine the amount of judgment against the defamer. Sometimes a person's reputation is so great that most defamation cannot do him/her much harm. (See: defamation, libel, slander)

reputation

noun acclaim, celebration, celebrity, credit, distinction, eminence, esteem, estimation, fama, fame, famousness, glory, good name, illustriousness, importance, luster, mark, name, notability, note, notoriety, opinio, popular favor, position, position in society, preeminence, prestige, prominence, rank, regard, renown, report, repute, respect, respectability, standing, status
Associated concepts: character witness, reputation evidence
See also: credit, notoriety, prestige, recognition, regard

REPUTATION, evidence. The opinion generally entertained by persons who know another, as to his character, (q.v.) or it is the opinion generally entertained by person; who know a family as to its pedigree, and the like.
     2. In general, reputation is evidence to prove, 1st. A man's character in society. 2d. A pedigree. (q.v.) 3d. Certain prescriptive or customary rights and obligations and matters of public notoriety. (q.v.) But as such evidence is in its own nature very weak, it must be supported. 1st. When it relates to the exercise of the right or privilege, by proof of acts of enjoyment of such right or privilege, within the period of living memory; 1 Maule & Selw. 679; 5 T. R. 32; afterwards evidence of reputation may be given. 2d. The fact must be of a public nature. 3d. It must be derived from persons likely to know the facts. 4th. The facts must be general and, not particular. 5th. They must be free from suspicion. 1 Stark. Ev. 54 to 65. Vide 1 Har. & M'H. 152; 2 Nott & M'C. 114 5 Day, R. 290; 4 Hen. & M. 507; 1 Tayl. R. 121; 2 Hayw. 3; 8 S. & R. 159; 4 John. R. 52; 18 John. R. 346; 9 Mass. R. 414; 4 Burr. 2057; Dougl. 174; Cowp. 594; 3 Swanst. 400; Dudl. So. Car. R. 346; and arts. Character; Memory.

References in classic literature ?
The inference which naturally results from these considerations is this, that the President and senators so chosen will always be of the number of those who best understand our national interests, whether considered in relation to the several States or to foreign nations, who are best able to promote those interests, and whose reputation for integrity inspires and merits confidence.
I knew that the opening of safes was a particular hobby with him, and I understood the joy which it gave him to be confronted with this green and gold monster, the dragon which held in its maw the reputations of many fair ladies.
There would be no difficulty, of course, in finding a substitute for Captain Chalmers, but the race takes place this morning, and I am afraid, with all due respect to my daughter, that her mare hasn't the best of reputations.
contradictory: it may be used to make reputations and unmake them; to
Well, anyway, I had a bad reputation on a beach where there were no good reputations.
These two gentlemen were unusually cheerful just now; for the affair was pretty certain to make some noise, and could scarcely fail to enhance their reputations.
These tendencies appear in the plays of Francis Beaumont and John Fletcher, whose reputations are indissolubly linked together in one of the most famous literary partnerships of all time.
And please, as Glaucon requested of you, to exclude reputations; for unless you take away from each of them his true reputation and add on the false, we shall say that you do not praise justice, but the appearance of it; we shall think that you are only exhorting us to keep injustice dark, and that you really agree with Thrasymachus in thinking that justice is another's good and the interest of the stronger, and that injustice is a man's own profit and interest, though injurious to the weaker.
Very few reputations are gained by unsullied virtue.
The wild fertility of nature is felt in comparing our rigid names and reputations with our fluid consciousness.
Concerts and plays swept past them, money had been spent and renewed, reputations won and lost, and the city herself, emblematic of their lives, rose and fell in a continual flux, while her shallows washed more widely against the hills of Surrey and over the fields of Hertfordshire.
A mistrust of established reputations was strictly in character with the Assistant Commissioner's ability as detector.