restriction

(redirected from restrictionist)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Financial, Encyclopedia.

restriction

n. any limitation on activity, by statute, regulation or contract provision. In multi-unit real estate developments, condominium and cooperative housing projects, managed by homeowners' associations or similar organizations are usually required by state law to impose restrictions on use. Thus, the restrictions are part of the "covenants, conditions and restrictions," intended to enhance the use of common facilities and property, recorded and incorporated into the title of each owner.

restriction

noun  bonds, boundary, bounds, check, circumscription, condition, confinement, constriction, containment, curb, demarcation, finis, impediment, interdiction, limitation, modus, prohibition, qualification, regulation, reservation, restraint
Associated concepts: restriction on alienation
See also: abridgment, arrest, bar, barrier, blockade, bondage, censorship, check, clause, coercion, commitment, compulsion, condition, constraint, custody, damper, decrease, detention, deterrence, deterrent, disadvantage, duress, economy, embargo, enclosure, encumbrance, estoppel, fetter, force, frugality, guideline, hindrance, impediment, imprisonment, incarceration, injunction, limitation, moderation, modification, obstacle, obstruction, prohibition, provision, qualification, quota, reservation, restraint, salvo, veto
References in periodicals archive ?
To that conservative or restrictionist point, they are part of the reason--not the whole reason, but part of the reason--that you've seen drops in apprehensions, and that communities along the border are safe.
In the shorthand of conservative immigration restrictionists, Rubio was against "amnesty" before he sponsored a Senate bill providing a path to citizenship for 11 million undocumented immigrants in the US.
Molina argues that using a "racial scripts approach" is essential to understanding these restrictionist campaigns.
However, his arguments faced a constraint in the continued restrictiveness of a Congress dominated by restrictionist Republicans and Southern Democrats.
however, because the fatal flaw in most restrictionist state efforts is
Results are in agreement with the expectation that restrictionist views among natives are likely driven by concerns over economically vulnerable immigrants, i.
To summarize: A white working- and middle-class GOP would be restrictionist on immigration, militaristic on the border, protectionist on trade, and expansionist on welfare.
John McCain, had helped lead the push for the 2007 bill, but as a candidate embraced the "enforcement- only" strategy favored by his party's restrictionist fringe.
But after 1900, as the restrictionist movement gathered steam with the support of many in the Anglo-American elite, Jews began to reassess their views.
A non-Western restrictionist view has been formulated by Mohammed Ayoob who argues that "humanitarian intervention carries shades of neo-colonialism" and tends "to impair the capacity of states to provide for political order inside their frontiers"; as such, the suggestions is that "this contemporary revival of imperialism threatens to erode the legitimacy of an international society that for the first time has become truly global in character.
While the asylum-migration nexus refers to the blurring distinction between economic and forced migrants, which creates practical and theoretical difficulties to differentiate these categories, more and more emphasis is made on the irregular character of these migrants, which encourages authorities of developed countries to view forced migrants (in transit), as 'illegal', 'bogus' or opportunistic aliens, denying them access to refugee status, and designing restrictionist refugee regimes to protect sovereign territories from being 'invaded' (Paz 2011, p.
166 (discussing the restrictionist motivations behind antitrafficking legislation and enforcement in Georgia, Missouri, and Arizona).