restriction

(redirected from restrictionists)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Financial, Encyclopedia.

restriction

n. any limitation on activity, by statute, regulation or contract provision. In multi-unit real estate developments, condominium and cooperative housing projects, managed by homeowners' associations or similar organizations are usually required by state law to impose restrictions on use. Thus, the restrictions are part of the "covenants, conditions and restrictions," intended to enhance the use of common facilities and property, recorded and incorporated into the title of each owner.

restriction

noun  bonds, boundary, bounds, check, circumscription, condition, confinement, constriction, containment, curb, demarcation, finis, impediment, interdiction, limitation, modus, prohibition, qualification, regulation, reservation, restraint
Associated concepts: restriction on alienation
See also: abridgment, arrest, bar, barrier, blockade, bondage, censorship, check, clause, coercion, commitment, compulsion, condition, constraint, custody, damper, decrease, detention, deterrence, deterrent, disadvantage, duress, economy, embargo, enclosure, encumbrance, estoppel, fetter, force, frugality, guideline, hindrance, impediment, imprisonment, incarceration, injunction, limitation, moderation, modification, obstacle, obstruction, prohibition, provision, qualification, quota, reservation, restraint, salvo, veto
References in periodicals archive ?
In increasing federal court authority over punitive damages awards, the Supreme Court gave false comfort to tort restrictionists who seek statutory caps on such awards.
In its raw essence, the "culture" argument of the immigration restrictionists degrades into a political debate.
Barletta and other restrictionists are now finding ways to connect unemployment with immigration.
Elsewhere you'll learn that Spanish-speaking households pick up English at the same rate their European counterparts did back in the early 20th century; that the various employer verification programs under discussion will be inefficient, bureaucratic nightmares for native workers and bosses; that even economists favoring restrictionist policies admit low-skilled immigrants are a net plus to the economy; and that many of today's perceived problems are the unintended consequences of previous reforms.
In so arguing, tort restrictionists have attempted to turn the separation of powers doctrine on its head by asserting that the courts owe an unexamined and one-way deference to any and all legislative actions, and they have labeled this attitude "cooperation.
Yet there he was at the National Press Club on a panel sponsored by the restrictionist Center for Immigration Studies (CIS).
Too often, it seems, the pro-immigration types are willing to tolerate the reconquistas to get more bodies at their marches, while the restrictionists are happy to have anyone flooding Congress with letters and e-mails, even xenophobes.
Rebutting the concerns of restrictionists doesn't require "not militarizing" the Mexican border and most of the rest of what the president talked about it in May.
It is something of a cliche among immigration restrictionists to quote Bertolt Brecht to the effect that their opponents wish to dissolve the American people and elect another.
They say the rhetoric used by those border restrictionists, such as the Minuteman Civil Defense Corps and CAPS, teeters on alarmism rather than focusing on the country's broken border system.
In addition to a reduction in numbers, restrictionists appeared on the brink of enacting an array of policies that would have reversed America's history of generous admission levels: income requirements for immigrants trying to gain entry; a ban on the employment of foreign students upon their graduation from U.
Webb gingerly appealed to immigration restrictionists.