restriction

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restriction

n. any limitation on activity, by statute, regulation or contract provision. In multi-unit real estate developments, condominium and cooperative housing projects, managed by homeowners' associations or similar organizations are usually required by state law to impose restrictions on use. Thus, the restrictions are part of the "covenants, conditions and restrictions," intended to enhance the use of common facilities and property, recorded and incorporated into the title of each owner.

restriction

noun  bonds, boundary, bounds, check, circumscription, condition, confinement, constriction, containment, curb, demarcation, finis, impediment, interdiction, limitation, modus, prohibition, qualification, regulation, reservation, restraint
Associated concepts: restriction on alienation
See also: abridgment, arrest, bar, barrier, blockade, bondage, censorship, check, clause, coercion, commitment, compulsion, condition, constraint, custody, damper, decrease, detention, deterrence, deterrent, disadvantage, duress, economy, embargo, enclosure, encumbrance, estoppel, fetter, force, frugality, guideline, hindrance, impediment, imprisonment, incarceration, injunction, limitation, moderation, modification, obstacle, obstruction, prohibition, provision, qualification, quota, reservation, restraint, salvo, veto
References in periodicals archive ?
seem to be in competition to become Sessions's main replacement as Congress's foremost immigration restrictionist.
She shows how historic restrictionist campaigns--particularly the deportations and the attacks on naturalization and birthright citizenship--may not have succeeded as their advocates had hoped, but they did generate many of the racial scripts that would endure, especially scripts casting Mexicans as outsiders, their immigration as illegitimate, and state action against them as justified and indeed necessary.
legislation strategies employed by restrictionists, and the effect these
Fellow Virginia Republicans had become increasingly vocal about the desirability of separation should northern restrictionists prevail on the Missouri question.
69) Wheeler counterweighs another restrictionist argument (the selectivity of responses) by stressing that "it is important to distinguish between actions that are selective because states privilege selfish interests over the defence of human rights, and those that are selective because of prudential concerns.
Moreover, by "implementing policies to force illegals to deport themselves" (Krikorian, 2005: 6), restrictionists hope to institutionalize the attrition-through-enforcement doctrine through public policy, despite their political failures in gaining passage of an overhaul of the federal immigration system.
Immigration's proposed economic costs, particularly the idea of non-citizens "taking" benefits from legal permanent residents or natural-born citizens, have been a perennial justification for restrictionist policy.
For restrictionists, the lack of comprehensive reform was indeed a victory; as they saw it, comprehensive reform would have acted as a de facto amnesty.
McCain as a friend and full-bore ally of restrictionists like Rush Limbaugh, even though Mr.
This aspect of the legislation was immediately derided by immigration restrictionists as "amnesty," a word that would come back to haunt McCain as he progressed through the Republican presidential primaries and eventually became the party's presumptive nominee.
Immigration restrictionists still weren't going to countenance what they considered a giveaway to illegal immigrants, and immigration-advocacy groups resented what they perceived as unequal treatment.