result from


Also found in: Idioms.
See: accrue, arise
References in classic literature ?
A frequent change of men will result from a frequent return of elections; and a frequent change of measures from a frequent change of men: whilst energy in government requires not only a certain duration of power, but the execution of it by a single hand.
Whether it be instinctive or whether it result from the pedestrian education of childhood may be doubtful; it is, at any rate, less automatic than the previous acts, for a man might by conscious effort learn to perform it more skilfully, or even to suppress it altogether.
The macroscopic equations result from a process of averaging out, and may be different in different cases.
Indeed, to feel the happiness which may result from this, it is necessary we should possess the passion ourselves.
She had hoped against hope that this very thing might result from her conversation with Ghek.
The chief advantage that would result from the establishment of Socialism is, undoubtedly, the fact that Socialism would relieve us from that sordid necessity of living for others which, in the present condition of things, presses so hardly upon almost everybody.
It is immoral to use private property in order to alleviate the horrible evils that result from the institution of private property.
Because, even if the governing party in a State should be disposed to resist such temptations, yet as such temptations may, and commonly do, result from circumstances peculiar to the State, and may affect a great number of the inhabitants, the governing party may not always be able, if willing, to prevent the injustice meditated, or to punish the aggressors.
Data loss may result from system component failure or unplanned catastrophe.