revenue


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Related to revenue: sales revenue, Total revenue

Revenue

Return or profit such as the annual or periodic rents, profits, interest, or income from any type of real or Personal Property, received by an individual, a corporation, or a government.

Public revenues are the sources of income that a government collects and receives into its treasury and appropriates for the payment of its expenses.

revenue

noun compensation, dividends, earnings, emolument, gain, hire, income, intake, interest, livelihood, pay, payment, perquisites, proceeds, profit, receipts, reditus, remuneration, return, reward, salary, vectigal, wages, yield
Associated concepts: appropriation law, internal revenue, revenue bills, revenue law, revenue-producing income, revenue tax
See also: boom, capital, duty, earnings, finance, income, money, pay, perquisite, proceeds, profit, prosperity, rent, resource, substance, tax, wage

REVENUE. The income of the government arising from taxation, duties, and the like; and, according to some correct lawyers, under the idea of revenue is also included the proceeds of the sale of stocks, lands, and other property owned by the government. Story, Const. Sec. 877. Vide Money Bills. By revenue is also understood the income of private individuals and corporations.

References in classic literature ?
Meanwhile, there I was, a Surveyor of the Revenue and, so far as I have been able to understand, as good a Surveyor as need be.
Pine's death had happened suddenly, and that these papers, which he probably kept in his official desk, had never come to the knowledge of his heirs, or were supposed to relate to the business of the revenue.
Not content with refusing revenue," he continued, "this outlander refuses also to beegar" (this is the corvee or forced labor on the roads), "and stirs my people up to the like treason.
Not content with refusing revenue on his own part, he has bound half his village by an oath to the like treason.
Van Baerle began by expending his yearly revenue in laying the groundwork of his collection, after which he broke in upon his new guilders to bring it to perfection.
At the time when Cornelius van Baerle began to devote himself to tulip-growing, expending on this hobby his yearly revenue and the guilders of his father, there was at Dort, living next door to him, a citizen of the name of Isaac Boxtel who from the age when he was able to think for himself had indulged the same fancy, and who was in ecstasies at the mere mention of the word "tulban," which
In those branches of administration which the king did not himself direct, such for instance as the "fermes" (the public domains throughout the country on which a revenue was levied), the clerks were to their superior what the clerks of a business-house are to their employer; they learned a science which would one day advance them to prosperity.
He merged the collection of revenue into one channel, taxing consumption in bulk instead of taxing property.
For a man with one hundred thousand roubles of revenue, which was what everyone fixed as Vronsky's income, such debts, one would suppose, could hardly be embarrassing; but the fact was that he was far from having one hundred thousand.
Many, they say, abandoned all the pleasures and vanities of life for solitude and religious austerities; others devoted themselves to God in an ecclesiastical life; they who could not do these set apart their revenues for building churches, endowing chapels, and founding monasteries, and spent their wealth in costly ornaments for the churches and vessels for the altars.
Therefore, a prince, not being able to exercise this virtue of liberality in such a way that it is recognized, except to his cost, if he is wise he ought not to fear the reputation of being mean, for in time he will come to be more considered than if liberal, seeing that with his economy his revenues are enough, that he can defend himself against all attacks, and is able to engage in enterprises without burdening his people; thus it comes to pass that he exercises liberality towards all from whom he does not take, who are numberless, and meanness towards those to whom he does not give, who are few.
And for this reason, I said, money and honour have no attraction for them; good men do not wish to be openly demanding payment for governing and so to get the name of hirelings, nor by secretly helping themselves out of the public revenues to get the name of thieves.