inhibitor

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Related to reverse transcriptase inhibitor: NNRTI, NRTI
See: deterrent
References in periodicals archive ?
Study participants continued to receive the nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors they had been taking as part of their combination therapy with the PI.
BHAPs and related drugs are known as non- nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors.
In the United States and the European Union, Truvada is indicated in combination with other antiretroviral agents (such as non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors or protease inhibitors) for the treatment of HIV-1 infection in adults.
Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) list the combination of efavirenz, emtricitabine and tenofovir disoproxil fumarate as one of the preferred non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI)-based treatment regimens for use in appropriate patients who have never taken anti-HIV medicines before.
Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) list emtricitabine and tenofovir disoproxil fumarate as preferred agents for use as part of a non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI)-based regimen in appropriate patients who have never taken anti-HIV medicines before.
Abacavir is a nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI).
Nevirapine is a non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI), manufactured by Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc.
Delavirdine is a non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI), manufactured by Pharmacia & Upjohn.
Both Truvada and Combivir are widely used fixed-dose combination medicines from the nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI) class of antiretrovirals.
Nucleoside/Nucleotide Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors plus Non-nucleoside
Use of nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors and risk of myocardial infarction in HIV-infected patients The SMART/INSIGHT and DAD Study Groups AIDS, 2008, 22, F17-F24
The group conducted a study, published recently in the New England Journal of Medicine, that investigated the association of cumulative exposure to protease inhibitors and non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors with the risk of myocardial infarction.

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