right to adjudicate

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In these ways, Catholic leaders differed from Protestant Reformers who, Botham contends, granted the state the right to adjudicate marriage law by deeming it a civil institution.
However, oral contracts are still relatively commonplace and, accordingly, the requirement that the contract be in writing can sometimes mean that the right to adjudicate is unavailable to those who are most in need of it.
After all, if a party still has the right to adjudicate on an oral contract, surely they are less likely to draw up a written contract?
The General Medical Council would lose the right to adjudicate in fitness to practise cases when complaints were made against doctors.
It held that "Texas may not reserve to its probate courts the exclusive right to adjudicate a transitory tort .
McElroy inquires, "Perhaps the most basic question regarding trial by jury was: how can a government or any collective entity claim the right to adjudicate the case of an individual if that person does not first delegate that right?
Uefa officials, who failed even to turn up, launched an eleventh hour bid to get the whole affair thrown out by questioning the court's right to adjudicate in a written deposition.
Apiarius returned to notoriety in 425, and at his second trial the African bishops rebuked Pope Celestine for accepting appeals from Africa and sending foreign representatives, invoked Nicaea's canon 5, asserted a council's right to adjudicate such matters and, in fact, prohibited all appeals to Rome.
They also need to remember that despite the presence of tribal jurisdiction, the State also retains considerable concurrent jurisdiction as well-including the right to enforce criminal laws, the right to tax developed Native corporation lands (as specially noted in ANCSA), and the right to adjudicate civil disputes in the state court system.