rights


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Related to rights: Miranda rights, Bill of Rights, Natural rights, Constitutional rights

rights

n. 1) plural of right, which is the collection of entitlements which a person may have and which are protected by the government and the courts, or under an agreement (contract). 2) slang for the information which must be given by law enforcement officers to a person who is about to be arrested, is a prime suspect in a crime, or is officially accused of a crime. These "rights" are short for "Miranda rights," which the Supreme Court in Miranda v. Arizona (1966), required be read to alleged criminals, including the rights to remain silent and to have an attorney (and if the suspect cannot afford a lawyer, one will be provided), and warning that anything the suspect says can be used against him/her in court. Failure to recite these rights means that a confession may not be used as evidence. (See: Miranda warning)

References in classic literature ?
If I could convince myself that I have any right to be satisfied with men as they are, and to treat them accordingly, and not according, in some respects, to my requisitions and expectations of what they and I ought to be, then, like a good Mussulman and fatalist, I should endeavor to be satisfied with things as they are, and say it is the will of God.
For eighteen hundred years, though perchance I have no right to say it, the New Testament has been written; yet where is the legislator who has wisdom and practical talent enough to avail himself of the light which it sheds on the science of legislation.
They were unnecessary, he said, because the Constitution had not granted the government the powers that the Bill of Rights would guard against.
It seeks this power in two ways: electing ultra-conservatives who will appoint judges who oppose church-state separation, reproductive rights and other freedoms and pressuring Congress to pass laws banning the courts from hearing certain types of cases--usually those dealing with the Pledge of Allegiance, school prayer, same-sex marriage, religious symbols on public property and legal abortion.
It contributes to the ongoing debate on human rights and health care and, by focusing on many of the complex issues related to the right to health, it offers useful insights into the way human rights ideas can be incorporated into social policy.
This history suggests that a principled form of libertarian judicial activism--that is, one that consistently upholds individual rights while strictly limiting state power--is essential to the fight for a free society.
Also, Pennsylvania's Declaration of Rights of September 1776, which reflects the language of the other colonies' Declarations of Rights, makes clear that individuals have the right to keep arms: "'That people have a right to bear arms for the defence of themselves and the state; and as standing armies .
Specifically, Dershowitz argues that the origin of rights can be explained empirically, that rights are created by societies to prevent the recurrence of wrongs.
The reason is that rights and duties are the same reality.
Recalling FDR's proposal for a "second of bill of rights" protecting basic human needs, Sunstein urges Americans to recognize a new list of constitutional rights, including access to a good education and health care, and the opportunity to work at a fair wage--in essence, economic rights in addition to the largely political rights enshrined in the country's founding documents.
This paper is not designed to respond to the attacks of those authors who assail the philosophy, conceptualization, formulation, and application of human rights policy among Muslims.
Understanding the protections of the Fifth and Sixth Amendment rights to counsel and the concomitant procedural rules begins with an appreciation of the principals that underlie those rights.