rudeness


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See: contempt, contumely, disparagement, disregard, disrespect, ingratitude, rebuff, temerity

RUDENESS, crim. law. An impolite action; contrary to the usual rules observed in society, committed by one person against another.
     2. This is a relative term which it is difficult to define: those acts which one friend might do to another, could not be justified by persons altogether unacquainted persons moving in polished society could not be permitted to do to each other, what boatmen, hostlers, and such persons might perhaps justify. 2 Hagg. Eccl. R. 73. An act done by a gentleman towards a lady might be considered rudeness, which, if done by one gentleman to another might not be looked upon in that light. Russ. & Ry. 130.
     3. A person who touches another with rudeness is guilty of a battery. (q.v.)

References in classic literature ?
One of the Ooryas half apologized for his rudeness overnight, saying that he had never known his mistress of so bland a temper, and he ascribed it to the presence of the strange priest.
Then, summoning the wild courage of despair, a throng of the revellers at once threw themselves into the black apartment, and, seizing the mummer, whose tall figure stood erect and motionless within the shadow of the ebony clock, gasped in unutterable horror at finding the grave cerements and corpse-like mask, which they handled with so violent a rudeness, untenanted by any tangible form.
She knew not how such an offence as hers might be classed by the laws of worldly politeness, to what a degree of unforgivingness it might with propriety lead, nor to what rigours of rudeness in return it might justly make her amenable.
But Fanny Price hated him to take suggestions from anyone but herself, and when he asked her help after someone else had been talking to him she would refuse with brutal rudeness.
Sometimes she would question Clayton as to the strange noises of the nights; the absence of servants and friends, and the strange rudeness of the furnishings within her room, but, though he made no effort to deceive her, never could she grasp the meaning of it all.
It is whoever you please, my good Planchet; but pardon my rudeness.
I set myself above him and so become much worse than he, for he is lenient to my rudeness while I on the contrary nourish contempt for him.
Sir Godwin's rudeness towards her and utter want of feeling ranged him with Dover and all other creditors-- disagreeable people who only thought of themselves, and did not mind how annoying they were to her.
But in spite of the dramatic rudeness which is sometimes of the idiosyncrasy, the true and native colour of his multitudinous dramatis personae, or monologists, Mr.
His reputation for rudeness was so well established that she moved away to a safe distance, before she ventured to look at him again.
To ask her plainly why it was necessary to keep the room in darkness while she remained in it, might prove (for all I knew to the contrary) to be an act of positive rudeness.
To take any other course would have been an act of downright rudeness, and would have excited remark.