run

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Related to run foul: predecessor

Run

To have legal validity in a prescribed territory; as in, the writ (a court order) runs throughout the county. To have applicability or legal effect during a prescribed period of time; as in, the Statute of Limitations has run against the claim. To follow or accompany; to be attached to another thing in pursuing a prescribed course or direction; as in, the Covenant (a written promise or restriction) runs with the land.

run

(Contend), verb announce a candidacy, aspire to political office, be a candidate, be designated a candidate, become an office seeker, campaign, campaign for office, campaign for public office, canvass, challenge an incumment, compete, run for office, seek election, seek re-eleccion, seek to become a public official, solicit votes, stand for election, strive, vie

run

(Flee), verb abscond, break away, dash, decamp, depart, disengage, escape, fly, hasten, hurry, leave, move swiftly, quit, race, retreat, rush, scamper, take flight

run

(Flow), verb advance, continue, drain out, elapse, extend, flood, go on, pass, proceed, pour, team, surge, trickle
Associated concepts: conditions and deeds running with the land, covenants running with the land, running at large, running of the statute of limitations

run

(Manage), verb carry on, conduct, direct, drive, function, govern, guide, handle, influence, maintain, oversee, perform, regulate, steer, superintend, work
See also: abscond, chain, conduct, demand, exude, flee, function, govern, hierarchy, manage, manipulate, market, moderate, officiate, operate, race, rule
References in periodicals archive ?
The Lord Chancellor has warned the media that naming the football stars may prejudice any future trial and they may also run foul of libel laws.
That said, companies must also take care not to run foul of local breastfeeding initiatives in marketing their latest innovations.
The story follows the fortunes of two likely lads, Jaxxon and Largs (Mark Prendergast and Darren Brownlie), a pair of horny layabouts who run foul of the Martian royal family, headed by Marj Hogarth's bombastic Queen.
Broadcasters have run foul of FCC decency standards before, facing fines for profanity and, in the case of Janet Jackson's 2004 Super Bowl show "wardrobe malfunction" nudity.
They run foul of privateers and are press ganged into an army of buccaneers hoping to steal gold and silver by sacking Spanish coastal towns in South America and from Spanish ships on the high sea.