run

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Run

To have legal validity in a prescribed territory; as in, the writ (a court order) runs throughout the county. To have applicability or legal effect during a prescribed period of time; as in, the Statute of Limitations has run against the claim. To follow or accompany; to be attached to another thing in pursuing a prescribed course or direction; as in, the Covenant (a written promise or restriction) runs with the land.

run

(Contend), verb announce a candidacy, aspire to political office, be a candidate, be designated a candidate, become an office seeker, campaign, campaign for office, campaign for public office, canvass, challenge an incumment, compete, run for office, seek election, seek re-eleccion, seek to become a public official, solicit votes, stand for election, strive, vie

run

(Flee), verb abscond, break away, dash, decamp, depart, disengage, escape, fly, hasten, hurry, leave, move swiftly, quit, race, retreat, rush, scamper, take flight

run

(Flow), verb advance, continue, drain out, elapse, extend, flood, go on, pass, proceed, pour, team, surge, trickle
Associated concepts: conditions and deeds running with the land, covenants running with the land, running at large, running of the statute of limitations

run

(Manage), verb carry on, conduct, direct, drive, function, govern, guide, handle, influence, maintain, oversee, perform, regulate, steer, superintend, work
See also: abscond, chain, conduct, demand, exude, flee, function, govern, hierarchy, manage, manipulate, market, moderate, officiate, operate, race, rule
References in periodicals archive ?
One eyewitness said: "As soon as we saw this bloke run past, we just hurried back inside The Heather.
Swansea have yet to comment, but Howard said: "He looked around, waited for Chuter to run past and deliberately elbowed him.
This contract, which will run past the year 2000, follows the completion of a prior contract we held from 1992 until completion in 1995.
Iain Vigurs went on a mazy solo run past several home defenders before burying the ball past Scott Morrison to give Inverness the lead.
Why, in the name of Pete Carroll, did this ponzi scheme have to be run past the USC football program?
Fraser inexplicably tried to flick the ball over Thomas and then run past him to kick upfield.
With extra time or penalties, it could run past 11pm.