salutation


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References in classic literature ?
I described to her the solitary moorland road, and the grey-gowned woman's figure in front of me, and the gig coming along to meet her, and the salutation of the two girls, and I told her all one look of her face had meant for me, and how I had wildly sought her in vain, and from that day to this had held her image in my heart.
On whom the Angel HAILE Bestowd, the holy salutation us'd Long after to blest MARIE, second EVE.
All stood up to receive her; and, replying to their courtesy by a mute gesture of salutation, she moved gracefully forward to assume her place at the board.
Good-night," she replied, stepping aside to avoid any salutation from Smilash.
Don Quixote returned his salutation with equal politeness, and dismounting from Rocinante advanced with well-bred bearing and grace to embrace him, and held him for some time close in his arms as if he had known him for a long time.
The chevalier returned the salutation stiffly, and drew Mademoiselle Cormon toward some flower-pots at a little distance, in order to show the interrupter that he did not choose to be spied upon.
He entirely omitted the usual formal salutation as we entered the presence of the jeddak, and as he pushed me roughly before the ruler he exclaimed in a loud and menacing voice.
The boy's lips formed a glad cry of salutation as his eyes first discovered the whites--a cry that was never uttered, for almost immediately he witnessed that which turned his happiness to anger as he saw that both the white men were wielding heavy whips brutally upon the naked backs of the poor devils staggering along beneath loads that would have overtaxed the strength and endurance of strong men at the beginning of a new day.
Having answered the Count's salutation, I turned to the glass again to see how I had been mistaken.
Hurst also made her a slight bow, and said he was "very glad"; but diffuseness and warmth remained for Bingley's salutation.
Otsego is said to be a word compounded of Ot, a place of meeting, and Sego, or Sago, the ordinary term of salutation used by the Indians of this region.
A general shout was the first expression of joy, and next a salutation was thundered from the cannon of the fort.